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dc.contributor.authorMartínez, María
dc.contributor.authorPostolache, Teodor T
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Bueno, Borja
dc.contributor.authorLeza, Juan C
dc.contributor.authorFiguero, Elena
dc.contributor.authorLowry, Christopher A
dc.contributor.authorMalan-Müller, Stefanie
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-15T19:11:12Z
dc.date.available2022-02-15T19:11:12Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/17992
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of anxiety, mood and trauma- and stress-related disorders are on the rise; however, efforts to develop new and effective treatment strategies have had limited success. To identify novel therapeutic targets, a comprehensive understanding of the disease etiology is needed, especially in the context of the holobiont, i.e., the superorganism consisting of a human and its microbiotas. Much emphasis has been placed on the role of the gut microbiota in the development, exacerbation, and persistence of psychiatric disorders; however, data for the oral microbiota are limited. The oral cavity houses the second most diverse microbial community in the body, with over 700 bacterial species that colonize the soft and hard tissues. Periodontal diseases encompass a group of infectious and inflammatory diseases that affect the periodontium. Among them, periodontitis is defined as a chronic, multi-bacterial infection that elicits low-grade systemic inflammation via the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as local invasion and long-distance translocation of periodontal pathogens. Periodontitis can also induce or exacerbate other chronic systemic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis and diabetes and can lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Recently, periodontal pathogens have been implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders (such as depression and schizophrenia), especially as dysregulation of the immune system also plays an integral role in the etiology and pathophysiology of these disorders. This review will discuss the role of the oral microbiota associated with periodontal diseases in anxiety, mood and trauma- and stress-related disorders. Epidemiological data of periodontal diseases in individuals with these disorders will be presented, followed by a discussion of the microbiological and immunological links between the oral microbiota and the central nervous system. Pre-clinical and clinical findings on the oral microbiota related to periodontal diseases in anxiety, mood and trauma- and stress-related phenotypes will be reviewed, followed by a discussion on the bi-directionality of the oral-brain axis. Lastly, we will focus on the oral microbiota associated with periodontal diseases as a target for future therapeutic interventions to alleviate symptoms of these debilitating psychiatric disorders.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.814177en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Psychiatryen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2022 Martínez, Postolache, García-Bueno, Leza, Figuero, Lowry and Malan-Müller.en_US
dc.subjectAggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitansen_US
dc.subjectPorphyromonas gingivalisen_US
dc.subjectanxiety disordersen_US
dc.subjectmood disordersen_US
dc.subjectoral microbiotaen_US
dc.subjectperiodontitisen_US
dc.subjecttrauma-related disordersen_US
dc.titleThe Role of the Oral Microbiota Related to Periodontal Diseases in Anxiety, Mood and Trauma- and Stress-Related Disorders.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyt.2021.814177
dc.identifier.pmid35153869
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in psychiatry
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.beginpage814177
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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