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dc.contributor.authorYong, Candice
dc.contributor.authorCambron-Mellott, M Janelle
dc.contributor.authorSeal, Brian
dc.contributor.authorWill, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorMaculaitis, Martine C
dc.contributor.authorClapp, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorMulvihill, Emily
dc.contributor.authorCotarla, Ion
dc.contributor.authorMehra, Ranee
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-07T14:54:43Z
dc.date.available2022-02-07T14:54:43Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-15
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/17902
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The approval of immune checkpoint inhibitors for metastatic non-small-cell lung carcinomas (mNSCLC) treatment has presented more care options. Therefore, it is important to identify the benefit-risk trade-offs patients and caregivers are willing to make among potential treatment options. This study quantified the preferences of patients and caregivers for attributes of mNSCLC treatment. Methods: Patients with mNSCLC and caregivers completed an online survey assessing preferences using a discrete choice experiment. Respondents chose between hypothetical treatment profiles, with varying levels for 7 attributes associated with first-line treatment, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, select adverse events (AEs), and regimen (caregivers). Hierarchical Bayesian modeling was used to estimate attribute-level preference weights. Results: Patients (n = 308) and caregivers (n = 166) most valued increasing OS from 11 to 30 months, followed by decreasing the risk of a serious AE (grade 3/4) that may lead to hospitalization from 70% to 18%. These attributes were over twice as important to both sets of respondents as the other attributes measured. Patients and caregivers would accept increases in the risks of a serious AE (grade 3/4) from 18% to 70% and all grades nausea from 10% to 69% if OS increased by 16.8 and 4.0 months, respectively. The least valued attributes were all grades of pneumonitis (patients) and all grades of skin rash (caregivers). Conclusion: Patients and caregivers are willing to make trade-offs between efficacy and toxicity and may require up to 1.5 years of increased OS to accept a higher risk of AEs. These results can provide guidance to oncologists when engaging in shared-decision making discussions. © 2022 Yong et al.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S338840en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherDove Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPatient Preference and aAdherenceen_US
dc.rights© 2022 Yong et al.en_US
dc.subjectimmune checkpoint inhibitorsen_US
dc.subjectmetastasesen_US
dc.subjectnon-small-cell lung carcinomasen_US
dc.subjectoverall survivalen_US
dc.subjectpatient preferenceen_US
dc.subjecttoxicitiesen_US
dc.titlePatient and Caregiver Preferences for First-Line Treatments of Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Discrete Choice Experiment.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2147/PPA.S338840
dc.identifier.pmid35068928
dc.source.journaltitlePatient preference and adherence
dc.source.volume16
dc.source.beginpage123
dc.source.endpage135
dc.source.countryNew Zealand


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