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dc.contributor.authorCarey, G B
dc.contributor.authorEzelle, H J
dc.contributor.authorSteinle, N
dc.contributor.authorCao, Q
dc.contributor.authorSimington, L
dc.contributor.authorMatson, C
dc.contributor.authorSingh, N
dc.contributor.authorJones, L
dc.contributor.authorMohindra, P
dc.contributor.authorCullen, K J
dc.contributor.authorGiglio, M
dc.contributor.authorParker, E
dc.contributor.authorHassel, B A
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-03T18:39:37Z
dc.date.available2022-02-03T18:39:37Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-31
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/17865
dc.descriptionThe original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake in which the color shading in Fig. 7 was not shown. The correct version of Fig. 7. is in https://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-022-02154-y
dc.description.abstractSummer internships serve important roles in training the next generation of biomedical researchers and healthcare providers through laboratory and clinical experiences that excite trainees about these fields and help them make informed decisions about career paths. The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID) pandemic and associated physical distancing restrictions precluded implementation of traditional in-person summer curricula and led to the cancellation of many internships across the USA. COVID-related disruptions also created opportunities for trainees to engage in remote research, become proficient in online learning platforms, and explore multidisciplinary topics. These skills are highly relevant to trainees as virtual interfaces occupy an increasingly mainstream role in their professional paths. The response to the COVID pandemic required real-time adaptations at all levels for major biomedical institutions including the University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB). Pivoting summer programs to a virtual format as part of this response provided a "teachable moment" to expose trainees to the innovation and resilience that are essential components of the biomedical profession. UMB summer programs, which span diverse biomedical disciplines from cancer research to diabetes, consolidated resources and identified mentors with online research projects to develop a robust virtual curriculum. Herein, data from a cancer-focused internship illustrate the collaborative adaptations to established components and creation of new learning modules in the transition to, and implementation of, online training. Outcomes are presented in the context of the COVID pandemic and significant societal issues that arose in the summer of 2020. The utility of virtual components and their impact on future programsis discussed.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-021-02124-wen_US
dc.description.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8801290/en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s13187-022-02154-y
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPergamon Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Cancer Educationen_US
dc.rights© 2021. The Author(s) under exclusive licence to American Association for Cancer Education.en_US
dc.subjectBiomedical researchen_US
dc.subjectCOVIDen_US
dc.subjectCancer educationen_US
dc.subjectSummer internshipen_US
dc.subjectUndergraduateen_US
dc.subjectVirtual curriculumen_US
dc.titleRobust Institutional Support and Collaboration Between Summer Training Programs in Cancer and Biomedicine Drive the Pivot to a Virtual Format in Response to the COVID Pandemic.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s13187-021-02124-w
dc.identifier.pmid35098479
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of cancer education : the official journal of the American Association for Cancer Education
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryEngland


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