Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCounson, Isabelle
dc.contributor.authorHosemans, Dominic
dc.contributor.authorLal, Tara J.
dc.contributor.authorMott, Brendan
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Samuel B.
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Sadhbh
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-01T16:44:34Z
dc.date.available2022-02-01T16:44:34Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationCouson, I., Hosemans, D., Lal, T., Mott, B., Harvey, S., and Joyce, S. ( 2019). Mental health and mindfulness amongst Australian fire fighters. BMC Psychology., 9 p.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/17833
dc.description.abstractBackground: While extensive research has highlighted the positive mental health outcomes associated with mindfulness, little work has examined how mindfulness may protect the mental health of first responders exposed to trauma. This is important as there is increasing evidence that mindfulness skills, if protective, can be taught to groups of at-risk workers. The purpose of the current research was to examine the potential role mindfulness may have in supporting the mental health of Australian fire fighters. -- Methods: The sample consisted of 114 professional fire fighters who completed demographic and job-related questions followed by measures of mindfulness (FMI-14), well-being (WHO-5), depression (HADS-D) and anxiety (HADS-A). Hierarchical multiple linear regressions were performed to determine whether levels of mindfulness were associated with anxiety, depression and wellbeing after accounting for age and number of years of fire service. -- Results: High levels of mindfulness were associated with decreased depression (p ≤ .001) and anxiety (p ≤ .001) as well as increased psychological well-being (p ≤ .001). Measures of mindfulness were able to explain a substantial amount of the variability in well-being (26.8%), anxiety (23.6%) and depression (22.4%), regardless of age and years of fire service. -- Conclusions: The present study provides evidence for robust associations between dispositional mindfulness and mental health markers of depression, anxiety and well-being in Australian fire fighters recently exposed to trauma. Mindfulness is a psychological characteristic that may be able to be modified, although further research is required to substantiate these findings and to formally test mindfulness interventions. Such studies would allow greater insight into the underlying mechanisms through which mindfulness may exert its beneficial effects.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Psychologyen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subject.lcshFire fightersen_US
dc.subject.lcshAustraliaen_US
dc.subject.lcshMental healthen_US
dc.subject.lcshAnxietyen_US
dc.subject.lcshWell-beingen_US
dc.subject.meshDepressionen_US
dc.subject.meshMindfulnessen_US
dc.titleMental health and mindfulness amongst Australian fire fightersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionYesen_US
dc.identifier.ispublishedNoen_US
refterms.dateFOA2022-02-01T16:44:34Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Australian Firefighters.pdf
Size:
617.7Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International