Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorNasrin, Shamima
dc.contributor.authorHegerle, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorSen, Shaichi
dc.contributor.authorNkeze, Joseph
dc.contributor.authorSen, Sunil
dc.contributor.authorPermala-Booth, Jasnehta
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Myeongjin
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, James
dc.contributor.authorTapia, Milagritos D
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, J Kristie
dc.contributor.authorSow, Samba O
dc.contributor.authorThaden, Joshua T
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Vance G
dc.contributor.authorKrogfelt, Karen A
dc.contributor.authorBrauner, Annelie
dc.contributor.authorProtonotariou, Efthymia
dc.contributor.authorChristaki, Eirini
dc.contributor.authorShindo, Yuichiro
dc.contributor.authorKwa, Andrea L
dc.contributor.authorShakoor, Sadia
dc.contributor.authorSingh-Moodley, Ashika
dc.contributor.authorPerovic, Olga
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Jan
dc.contributor.authorLunguya, Octavie
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Raphael
dc.contributor.authorCross, Alan S
dc.contributor.authorTennant, Sharon M
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-18T21:04:47Z
dc.date.available2022-01-18T21:04:47Z
dc.date.issued2022-01-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/17506
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a wide range of acute and chronic infections and is frequently associated with healthcare-associated infections. Because of its ability to rapidly acquire resistance to antibiotics, P. aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat. Alternative strategies, such as a vaccine, are needed to prevent infections. We collected a total of 413 P. aeruginosa isolates from the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients from 10 countries located on 4 continents during 2005–2017 and characterized these isolates to inform vaccine development efforts. We determined the diversity and distribution of O antigen and flagellin types and antibiotic susceptibility of the invasive P. aeruginosa. We used an antibody-based agglutination assay and PCR for O antigen typing and PCR for flagellin typing. We determined antibiotic susceptibility using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Results: Of the 413 isolates, 314 (95%) were typed by an antibody-based agglutination assay or PCR (n = 99). Among the 20 serotypes of P. aeruginosa, the most common serotypes were O1, O2, O3, O4, O5, O6, O8, O9, O10 and O11; a vaccine that targets these 10 serotypes would confer protection against more than 80% of invasive P. aeruginosa infections. The most common flagellin type among 386 isolates was FlaB (41%). Resistance to aztreonam (56%) was most common, followed by levofloxacin (42%). We also found that 22% of strains were non-susceptible to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. Ninety-nine (27%) of our collected isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Isolates with FlaA2 flagellin were more commonly multidrug resistant (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Vaccines targeting common O antigens and two flagellin antigens, FlaB and FlaA2, would offer an excellent strategy to prevent P. aeruginosa invasive infections. © 2022, The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-021-02427-4en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Microbiologyen_US
dc.rights© 2022. The Author(s).en_US
dc.subjectFlagellinen_US
dc.subjectMultidrug resistanceen_US
dc.subjectPseudomonasen_US
dc.subjectSerotypeen_US
dc.titleDistribution of serotypes and antibiotic resistance of invasive Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a multi-country collection.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12866-021-02427-4
dc.identifier.pmid34991476
dc.source.journaltitleBMC microbiology
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage13
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryEngland


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record