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dc.contributor.authorLuo, Zhenwu
dc.contributor.authorFitting, Sylvia
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Catrina
dc.contributor.authorBenitez, Andreana
dc.contributor.authorLi, Min
dc.contributor.authorWu, Yongxia
dc.contributor.authorFu, Xiaoyu
dc.contributor.authorAmato, Davide
dc.contributor.authorNing, Wangbin
dc.contributor.authorFunderburg, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xu
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Zejun
dc.contributor.authorYu, Xuezhong
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorCong, Xiaomei
dc.contributor.authorXu, Wanli
dc.contributor.authorMaas, Kendra
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Bethany J
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Lei
dc.contributor.authorYu, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorScott, Alison
dc.contributor.authorMcrae-Clark, Aimee
dc.contributor.authorHamlett, Eric D
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Wei
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-30T13:24:29Z
dc.date.available2021-11-30T13:24:29Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/17196
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about chronic cannabis smoking-associated oral microbiome and its effects on central nervous system (CNS) functions. Methods: In the current study, we have analyzed the saliva microbiome in individuals who chronically smoked cannabis with cannabis use disorder (n = 16) and in non-smoking controls (n = 27). The saliva microbiome was analyzed using microbial 16S rRNA sequencing. To investigate the function of cannabis use-associated oral microbiome, mice were orally inoculated with live Actinomyces meyeri, Actinomyces odontolyticus, or Neisseria elongata twice per week for six months, which mimicked human conditions. Findings: We found that cannabis smoking in humans was associated with oral microbial dysbiosis. The most increased oral bacteria were Streptococcus and Actinomyces genus and the most decreased bacteria were Neisseria genus in chronic cannabis smokers compared to those in non-smokers. Among the distinct species bacteria in cannabis smokers, the enrichment of Actinomyces meyeri was inversely associated with the age of first cannabis smoking. Strikingly, oral exposure of Actinomyces meyeri, an oral pathobiont, but not the other two control bacteria, decreased global activity, increased macrophage infiltration, and increased β-amyloid 42 protein production in the mouse brains. Interpretation: This is the first study to reveal that long-term oral cannabis exposure is associated oral enrichment of Actinomyces meyeri and its contributions to CNS abnormalities.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103701en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEBioMedicineen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021. Published by Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.subjectActinomyces meyerien_US
dc.subjectCannabis smokingen_US
dc.subjectOral microbiomeen_US
dc.subjectβ-amyloiden_US
dc.titleChronic cannabis smoking-enriched oral pathobiont drives behavioral changes, macrophage infiltration, and increases β-amyloid protein production in the brainen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ebiom.2021.103701
dc.identifier.pmid34826801
dc.source.volume74
dc.source.beginpage103701
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryNetherlands


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