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dc.contributor.authorShuster, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorCasserly, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorLipford, Erika
dc.contributor.authorOlszewski, Rafal
dc.contributor.authorMilon, Béatrice
dc.contributor.authorViechweg, Shaun
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Kanisa
dc.contributor.authorEnoch, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorMcMurray, Mark
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Mark A.
dc.contributor.authorOhlemiller, Kevin K.
dc.contributor.authorHoa, Michael
dc.contributor.authorDepireux, Didier A.
dc.contributor.authorMong, Jessica A.
dc.contributor.authorHertzano, Ronna
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-18T18:33:27Z
dc.date.available2021-11-18T18:33:27Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/17151
dc.description.abstractRecent studies have identified sex-differences in auditory physiology and in the susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). We hypothesize that 17β-estradiol (E2 ), a known modulator of auditory physiology, may underpin sex-differences in the response to noise trauma. Here, we gonadectomized B6CBAF1/J mice and used a combination of electrophysiological and histological techniques to study the effects of estrogen replacement on peripheral auditory physiology in the absence of noise exposure and on protection from NIHL. Functional analysis of auditory physiology in gonadectomized female mice revealed that E2-treatment modulated the peripheral response to sound in the absence of changes to the endocochlear potential compared to vehicle-treatment. E2-replacement in gonadectomized female mice protected against hearing loss following permanent threshold shift (PTS)-and temporary threshold shift (TTS)-inducing noise exposures. Histological analysis of the cochlear tissue revealed that E2-replacement mitigated outer hair cell loss and cochlear synaptopathy following noise exposure compared to vehicle-treatment. Lastly, using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we demonstrate co-localization of estrogen receptor-2 with type-1C, high threshold spiral ganglion neurons, suggesting that the observed protection from cochlear synaptopathy may occur through E2-mediated preservation of these neurons. Taken together, these data indicate the estrogen signaling pathways may be harnessed for the prevention and treatment of NIHL. © 2021 by the authors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Healthen_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijms222212208en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Molecular Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectAuditory physiologyen_US
dc.subjectCochlear synaptopa-thyen_US
dc.subjectEstrogenen_US
dc.subjectInner earen_US
dc.subjectMouse modelen_US
dc.subjectNoise-induced hearing lossen_US
dc.subjectSex-differencesen_US
dc.titleEstradiol protects against noise-induced hearing loss and modulates auditory physiology in female miceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijms222212208
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.issue22


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