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dc.contributor.authorAdams, Rick A
dc.contributor.authorPinotsis, Dimitris
dc.contributor.authorTsirlis, Konstantinos
dc.contributor.authorUnruh, Leonhardt
dc.contributor.authorMahajan, Aashna
dc.contributor.authorHoras, Ana Montero
dc.contributor.authorConvertino, Laura
dc.contributor.authorSummerfelt, Ann
dc.contributor.authorSampath, Hemalatha
dc.contributor.authorDu, Xiaoming Michael
dc.contributor.authorKochunov, Peter
dc.contributor.authorJi, Jie Lisa
dc.contributor.authorRepovs, Grega
dc.contributor.authorMurray, John D
dc.contributor.authorFriston, Karl J
dc.contributor.authorHong, L Elliot
dc.contributor.authorAnticevic, Alan
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-07T17:12:28Z
dc.date.available2021-10-07T17:12:28Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/16801
dc.description.abstractBackground: Diminished synaptic gain—the sensitivity of postsynaptic responses to neural inputs—may be a fundamental synaptic pathology in schizophrenia. Evidence for this is indirect, however. Furthermore, it is unclear whether pyramidal cells or interneurons (or both) are affected, or how these deficits relate to symptoms. Methods: People with schizophrenia diagnoses (PScz) (n = 108), their relatives (n = 57), and control subjects (n = 107) underwent 3 electroencephalography (EEG) paradigms—resting, mismatch negativity, and 40-Hz auditory steady-state response—and resting functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modeling was used to quantify synaptic connectivity in cortical microcircuits. Results: Classic group differences in EEG features between PScz and control subjects were replicated, including increased theta and other spectral changes (resting EEG), reduced mismatch negativity, and reduced 40-Hz power. Across all 4 paradigms, characteristic PScz data features were all best explained by models with greater self-inhibition (decreased synaptic gain) in pyramidal cells. Furthermore, disinhibition in auditory areas predicted abnormal auditory perception (and positive symptoms) in PScz in 3 paradigms. Conclusions: First, characteristic EEG changes in PScz in 3 classic paradigms are all attributable to the same underlying parameter change: greater self-inhibition in pyramidal cells. Second, psychotic symptoms in PScz relate to disinhibition in neural circuits. These findings are more commensurate with the hypothesis that in PScz, a primary loss of synaptic gain on pyramidal cells is then compensated by interneuron downregulation (rather than the converse). They further suggest that psychotic symptoms relate to this secondary downregulation.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.07.024en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiological Psychiatryen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectAuditory steady-stateen_US
dc.subjectDynamic causal modelen_US
dc.subjectMismatch negativityen_US
dc.subjectPsychosisen_US
dc.subjectResting stateen_US
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_US
dc.titleComputational Modeling of Electroencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Paradigms Indicates a Consistent Loss of Pyramidal Cell Synaptic Gain in Schizophreniaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.07.024
dc.identifier.pmid34598786
dc.source.countryUnited States


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