Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHong, Sungmin
dc.contributor.authorGiese, Anne-Katrin
dc.contributor.authorSchirmer, Markus D
dc.contributor.authorBonkhoff, Anna K
dc.contributor.authorBretzner, Martin
dc.contributor.authorRist, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorDalca, Adrian V
dc.contributor.authorRegenhardt, Robert W
dc.contributor.authorEtherton, Mark R
dc.contributor.authorDonahue, Kathleen L
dc.contributor.authorNardin, Marco
dc.contributor.authorMocking, Steven J T
dc.contributor.authorMcIntosh, Elissa C
dc.contributor.authorAttia, John
dc.contributor.authorBenavente, Oscar R
dc.contributor.authorCole, John W
dc.contributor.authorDonatti, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorGriessenauer, Christoph J
dc.contributor.authorHeitsch, Laura
dc.contributor.authorHolmegaard, Lukas
dc.contributor.authorJood, Katarina
dc.contributor.authorJimenez-Conde, Jordi
dc.contributor.authorRoquer, Jaume
dc.contributor.authorKittner, Steven J
dc.contributor.authorLemmens, Robin
dc.contributor.authorLevi, Christopher R
dc.contributor.authorMcDonough, Caitrin W
dc.contributor.authorMeschia, James F
dc.contributor.authorPhuah, Chia-Ling
dc.contributor.authorRolfs, Arndt
dc.contributor.authorRopele, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorRosand, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorRundek, Tatjana
dc.contributor.authorSacco, Ralph L
dc.contributor.authorSchmidt, Reinhold
dc.contributor.authorEnzinger, Christian
dc.contributor.authorSharma, Pankaj
dc.contributor.authorSlowik, Agnieszka
dc.contributor.authorSousa, Alessandro
dc.contributor.authorStanne, Tara M
dc.contributor.authorStrbian, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorTatlisumak, Turgut
dc.contributor.authorThijs, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorVagal, Achala
dc.contributor.authorWasselius, Johan
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorZand, Ramin
dc.contributor.authorMcArdle, Patrick F
dc.contributor.authorWorrall, Bradford B
dc.contributor.authorWu, Ona
dc.contributor.authorJern, Christina
dc.contributor.authorLindgren, Arne G
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Jane
dc.contributor.authorTomppo, Liisa
dc.contributor.authorGolland, Polina
dc.contributor.authorRost, Natalia S
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-30T12:45:20Z
dc.date.available2021-09-30T12:45:20Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/16739
dc.description.abstractObjective: To personalize the prognostication of post-stroke outcome using MRI-detected cerebrovascular pathology, we sought to investigate the association between the excessive white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden unaccounted for by the traditional stroke risk profile of individual patients and their long-term functional outcomes after a stroke. Methods: We included 890 patients who survived after an acute ischemic stroke from the MRI-Genetics Interface Exploration (MRI-GENIE) study, for whom data on vascular risk factors (VRFs), including age, sex, atrial fibrillation, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary artery disease, smoking, prior stroke history, as well as acute stroke severity, 3- to-6-month modified Rankin Scale score (mRS), WMH, and brain volumes, were available. We defined the unaccounted WMH (uWMH) burden via modeling of expected WMH burden based on the VRF profile of each individual patient. The association of uWMH and mRS score was analyzed by linear regression analysis. The odds ratios of patients who achieved full functional independence (mRS < 2) in between trichotomized uWMH burden groups were calculated by pair-wise comparisons. Results: The expected WMH volume was estimated with respect to known VRFs. The uWMH burden was associated with a long-term functional outcome (β = 0.104, p < 0.01). Excessive uWMH burden significantly reduced the odds of achieving full functional independence after a stroke compared to the low and average uWMH burden [OR = 0.4, 95% CI: (0.25, 0.63), p < 0.01 and OR = 0.61, 95% CI: (0.42, 0.87), p < 0.01, respectively]. Conclusion: The excessive amount of uWMH burden unaccounted for by the traditional VRF profile was associated with worse post-stroke functional outcomes. Further studies are needed to evaluate a lifetime brain injury reflected in WMH unrelated to the VRF profile of a patient as an important factor for stroke recovery and a plausible indicator of brain health.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2021.700616en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Neurologyen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 Hong, Giese, Schirmer, Bonkhoff, Bretzner, Rist, Dalca, Regenhardt, Etherton, Donahue, Nardin, Mocking, McIntosh, Attia, Benavente, Cole, Donatti, Griessenauer, Heitsch, Holmegaard, Jood, Jimenez-Conde, Roquer, Kittner, Lemmens, Levi, McDonough, Meschia, Phuah, Rolfs, Ropele, Rosand, Rundek, Sacco, Schmidt, Enzinger, Sharma, Slowik, Sousa, Stanne, Strbian, Tatlisumak, Thijs, Vagal, Wasselius, Woo, Zand, McArdle, Worrall, Wu, Jern, Lindgren, Maguire, Tomppo, Golland, Rost and the MRI-GENIE and GISCOME Investigators and the International Stroke Genetics Consortium.en_US
dc.subjectacute ischemic strokeen_US
dc.subjectbrain healthen_US
dc.subjectbrain vulnerabilityen_US
dc.subjectfunctional independenceen_US
dc.subjectfunctional outcome after acute strokeen_US
dc.subjectpost-stroke outcomesen_US
dc.subjectstrokeen_US
dc.subjectwhite matter hyperintensityen_US
dc.titleExcessive White Matter Hyperintensity Increases Susceptibility to Poor Functional Outcomes After Acute Ischemic Strokeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fneur.2021.700616
dc.identifier.pmid34566844
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.beginpage700616
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record