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dc.contributor.authorPotter, Gail E.
dc.contributor.authorCarnegie, Nicole Bohme
dc.contributor.authorSugimoto, Jonathan D.
dc.contributor.authorDiallo, Aldiouma
dc.contributor.authorVictor, John C.
dc.contributor.authorNeuzil, Kathleen M.
dc.contributor.authorHalloran, M. Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-27T17:56:13Z
dc.date.available2021-09-27T17:56:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/16725
dc.description.abstractThis study estimates the overall effect of two influenza vaccination programs consecutively administered in a cluster-randomized trial in western Senegal over the course of two influenza seasons from 2009 to 2011. We apply cutting-edge methodology combining social contact data with infection data to reduce bias in estimation arising from contamination between clusters. Our time-varying estimates reveal a reduction in seasonal influenza from the intervention and a non-significant increase in H1N1 pandemic influenza. We estimate an additive change in overall cumulative incidence (which was 6.13% in the control arm) of -0.68 percentage points during Year 1 of the study (95% CI: −2.53, 1.18). When H1N1 pandemic infections were excluded from analysis, the estimated change was −1.45 percentage points and was significant (95% CI, −2.81, −0.08). Because cross-cluster contamination was low (0–3% of contacts for most villages), an estimator assuming no contamination was only slightly attenuated (−0.65 percentage points). These findings are encouraging for studies carefully designed to minimize spillover. Further work is needed to estimate contamination – and its effect on estimation – in a variety of settings. © 2021 Royal Statistical Society. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Healthen_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/rssc.12522en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series C: Applied Statisticsen_US
dc.subjectadditive hazardsen_US
dc.subjectcluster randomizeden_US
dc.subjectcontaminationen_US
dc.subjectinterferenceen_US
dc.subjectoverall effecten_US
dc.subjectsocial networken_US
dc.subjectspilloveren_US
dc.titleUsing social contact data to improve the overall effect estimate of a cluster-randomized influenza vaccination program in Senegalen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/rssc.12522


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