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dc.contributor.authorShah, Chintal H
dc.contributor.authorReed, Robert M
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Yulan
dc.contributor.authorZafari, Zafar
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-24T14:29:36Z
dc.date.available2021-09-24T14:29:36Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/16707
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: While forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) is a hallmark of disease progression in chronic obstructive lung diseases, little is known about the relationship between baseline FEV1 and future risks of other medical conditions. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between baseline FEV1 and future risks of diabetes, asthma, myocardial infarction, hypertension and all-cause mortality. METHODS: We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and its Epidemiological Follow-Up Study. Our data provided longitudinal follow-up of the original cohort for up to 12 years. We used two competing risks approaches, the cause-specific hazard model and the Fine-Gray sub-distribution hazard model, to measure the associations between baseline FEV1 and future risks of the outcomes of interest. All models were adjusted for major confounding factors. RESULTS: The final sample included 3020 participants (mean±sd baseline age 44.64±13.44 years). In the cause-specific hazard model, for every per cent increase in the baseline per cent predicted FEV1, the hazard of the event reduced by 2.5% (HR 0.975; 95% CI 0.958-0.994) for diabetes, 4.3% (HR 0.957; 95% CI 0.932-0.983) for asthma and 1.8% (HR 0.982; 95% CI 0.971-0.992) for all-cause mortality. There was no statistically significant association between baseline per cent predicted FEV1 and future risks of myocardial infarction (HR 0.987; 95% CI 0.970-1.004) and hypertension (HR 0.998; 95% CI 0.992-1.005). Consistent results were observed for the Fine-Gray sub-distribution hazard model. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that lower per cent predicted FEV1 values at baseline were significantly associated with higher future risks of diabetes, asthma and all-cause mortality.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1183/23120541.00178-2021en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEuropean Respiratory Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofERJ Open Researchen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©The authors 2021.en_US
dc.subjectFEV1en_US
dc.subject.meshAsthmaen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitusen_US
dc.subject.meshForced Expiratory Volumeen_US
dc.subject.meshMortalityen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSpirometryen_US
dc.titleAssociation between lung function and future risks of diabetes, asthma, myocardial infarction, hypertension and all-cause mortalityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1183/23120541.00178-2021
dc.identifier.pmid34549046
dc.source.volume7
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.countryEngland


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