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dc.contributor.authorYuen, Sydney C
dc.contributor.authorAmaefule, Adaeze Q
dc.contributor.authorKim, Hannah H
dc.contributor.authorOwoo, Breanna-Verissa
dc.contributor.authorGorman, Emily F
dc.contributor.authorMattingly, T Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-27T18:16:13Z
dc.date.available2021-08-27T18:16:13Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-24
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/16489
dc.description.abstractBackground: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with significant financial burden for patients and payers. The objective of this study was to review economic models to identify, evaluate, and compare cost-effectiveness estimates for HCC treatments. Methods: A systematic search of the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases to identify economic evaluations was performed and studies that modeled treatments for HCC reporting costs and cost effectiveness were included. Risk of bias was assessed qualitatively, considering costing approach, reported study perspective, and funding received. Intervention costs were adjusted to 2021 US dollars for comparison. For studies reporting quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), we conducted analyses stratified by comparison type to assess cost effectiveness at the time of the analysis. Results: A total of 27 studies were included. Non-curative versus non-curative therapy comparisons were used in 20 (74.1%) studies, curative versus curative comparisons were used in 5 (18.5%) studies, and curative versus non-curative comparisons were used in 2 (7.4%) studies. Therapy effectiveness was estimated using a QALY measure in 20 (74.1%) studies, while 7 (25.9%) studies only assessed life-years gained (LYG). A health sector perspective was used in 26 (96.3%) of the evaluations, with only 1 study including costs beyond this perspective. Median intervention cost was $53,954 (range $4550-$4,760,835), with a median incremental cost of $6546 (range - $72,441 to $1,279,764). In cost-utility analyses, 11 (55%) studies found the intervention cost effective using a $100,000/QALY threshold at the time of the study, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) ranging from - $1,176,091 to $1,152,440 when inflated to 2021 US dollars. Conclusion: The majority of HCC treatments were found to be cost effective, but with significant variation and with few studies considering indirect costs. Standards for value assessment for HCC treatments may help improve consistency and comparability.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s41669-021-00298-zen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPharmacoEconomics - Openen_US
dc.rights© 2021. The Author(s).en_US
dc.subject.lcshCancer--Treatmenten_US
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Hepatocellular--economicsen_US
dc.subject.meshCost-Benefit Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSystematic Reviewen_US
dc.titleA Systematic Review of Cost-Effectiveness Analyses for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treatmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s41669-021-00298-z
dc.identifier.pmid34427897
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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