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dc.contributor.authorMcDermott, Mary M
dc.contributor.authorTian, Lu
dc.contributor.authorCriqui, Michael H
dc.contributor.authorFerrucci, Luigi
dc.contributor.authorGreenland, Philip
dc.contributor.authorGuralnik, Jack M
dc.contributor.authorKibbe, Melina R
dc.contributor.authorLi, Lingyu
dc.contributor.authorSufit, Robert
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Lihui
dc.contributor.authorPolonsky, Tamar S
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-10T12:27:29Z
dc.date.available2021-06-10T12:27:29Z
dc.date.issued2021-06-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/15975
dc.description.abstractBackground In people with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease, the effects of exercise on patient-reported outcomes remain unclear. Methods and Results Four hundred four people with peripheral artery disease in 3 clinical trials were randomized to exercise (N=205) or a control group (N=199) and completed the 6-minute walk and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire distance score (score 0-100, 100=best) at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Compared with the control group, exercise improved 6-minute walk distance by +39.8 m (95% CI, 26.8-52.8, P<0.001) and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire distance score by +7.3 (95% CI, 2.4-12.1, P=0.003). In all, 2828 individual Walking Impairment Questionnaire distance score questions were completed at baseline and follow-up. Among participants who perceived no change in ability to walk 1 or more distances between baseline and follow-up, 6-minute walk improved in the exercise group and declined in the control group (+26.8 versus -6.5 m, P<0.001). Among participants who perceived that their walking ability worsened for 1 or more distances between baseline and follow-up, the 6-minute walk improved in the exercise group and declined in the control group (+18.4 versus -27.3 m, P<0.001). Among participants who reported worsening calf symptoms at follow-up, the exercise group improved and the control group declined (+28.9 versus -12.5 m, P<0.01). Conclusions In 3 randomized trials, exercise significantly improved the 6-minute walk distance in people with peripheral artery disease, but many participants randomized to exercise reported no change or decline in walking ability. These findings suggest a significant discrepancy in objectively measured walking improvement relative to perceived walking improvement in people with peripheral artery disease. Registration Information clinicaltrials.gov. Identifiers: NCT00106327, NCT01408901.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.120.017609en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Heart Associationen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Heart Associationen_US
dc.subjectexerciseen_US
dc.subjectintermittent claudicationen_US
dc.subjectpatient‐reported outcome measuresen_US
dc.subjectperipheral artery diseaseen_US
dc.titlePerceived Versus Objective Change in Walking Ability in Peripheral Artery Disease: Results from 3 Randomized Clinical Trials of Exercise Therapyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1161/JAHA.120.017609
dc.identifier.pmid34075780
dc.source.beginpagee017609
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryEngland


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