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dc.contributor.authorBernacki, Edward J
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Dan L
dc.contributor.authorYuspeh, Larry
dc.contributor.authorLavin, Robert A
dc.contributor.authorKalia, Nimisha
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Nina
dc.contributor.authorTsourmas, Nicholas F
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Leila
dc.contributor.authorTao, Xuguang Grant
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-28T15:27:18Z
dc.date.available2021-05-28T15:27:18Z
dc.date.issued2021-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/15840
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Determine the industries with the highest proportion of accepted COVID-19 related workers' compensation (WC) claims. METHODS: Study included 21,336 WC claims (1898 COVID-19 and 19,438 other claims) that were filed between January 1, 2020 and August 31, 2020 from 11 states in the Midwest United States. RESULT: The overwhelming proportion of all COVID-19 related WC claims submitted and accepted were from healthcare workers (83.77%). Healthcare was the only industrial classification that was at significantly higher COVID-19 WC claim submission risk (odds ratio [OR]: 4.00; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 2.77 to 5.79) controlling for type of employment, sex, age, and presumption of COVID-19 work-relatedness. Within healthcare employment, WC claims submitted by workers in medical laboratories had the highest risk (crude rate ratio of 8.78). CONCLUSION: Healthcare employment is associated with an increased risk of developing COVID-19 infections and submitting a workers' compensation claim.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000002126en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWolters Kluwer Healthen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicineen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.en_US
dc.subjectindustry typeen_US
dc.subject.lcshWorker's compensation claimsen_US
dc.subject.meshCOVID-19en_US
dc.titleWhat Industrial Categories Are Workers at Excess Risk of Filing a COVID-19 Workers' Compensation Claim? A Study Conducted in 11 Midwestern US Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/JOM.0000000000002126
dc.identifier.pmid33395171
dc.source.volume63
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage374
dc.source.endpage380
dc.source.countryUnited States


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