Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorAlhassan, Eaman
dc.contributor.authorGendelman, Hannah K
dc.contributor.authorSabha, Marwa M
dc.contributor.authorHawkins-Holt, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorSiaton, Bernadette C
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-10T14:18:40Z
dc.date.available2021-05-10T14:18:40Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/15608
dc.description.abstractObjective: Background: Case Report: Conclusions: Unusual clinical course Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can involve any part of the eye. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eye) is the most common ocular manifestation, followed by scleritis, episcleritis, and retinitis. Retinal disease affects around 10% of patients with SLE. Mild retinopathy may be asymptomatic. However, severe cases can cause visual loss requiring urgent ophthalmic evaluation. We present a case of bilateral retinal vasculitis as the presenting manifestation of SLE. A 14-year-old girl with a history of schizophrenia presented to the emergency department (ED) with generalized weakness. Four days before her presentation, she developed itching in her eyes and frontal headaches. In the ED, she reported blurry vision in her left eye only and diffuse arthralgia. The ophthalmic evaluation showed bilateral reduced visual acuity, worse in the left eye. Both eyes had diffuse hemorrhages, white retinal lesions, and blurred optic disc margins. She was diagnosed with panuveitis and retinal vasculitis. The patient was then found to have SLE, diagnosed by the presence of arthralgias, panuveitis, severe bilateral retinal vasculitis, positive ANA and anti-dsDNA, and normocytic anemia. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone with subsequent oral prednisone upon discharge, hydroxychloroquine, and azathioprine. One year after her presentation, she had significant visual improvement and no other system involvement. Retinal vasculitis, as the presenting symptom of SLE, has been overlooked in large studies. However, the number of case reports documenting this as a presenting symptom, often with minimal or no organ involvement, suggests that upon diagnosis, patients might benefit from a skilled ophthalmic evaluation. © Am J Case Rep, 2021.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.12659/AJCR.930650en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Scientific Information, Inc.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Case Reportsen_US
dc.subjectLupus Erythematosus, Systemicen_US
dc.subjectRetinal Vasculitisen_US
dc.subjectRetinitisen_US
dc.titleBilateral Retinal Vasculitis as the First Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.12659/AJCR.930650
dc.identifier.pmid33935278
dc.source.volume22
dc.source.beginpagee930650
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record