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dc.contributor.authorAlkhoury, Dana
dc.contributor.authorAtchison, Jared
dc.contributor.authorTrujillo, Antonio J
dc.contributor.authorOslin, Kimberly
dc.contributor.authorFrey, Katherine P
dc.contributor.authorO'Toole, Robert V
dc.contributor.authorCastillo, Renan C
dc.contributor.authorO'Hara, Nathan N
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-03T16:39:54Z
dc.date.available2021-05-03T16:39:54Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/15552
dc.description.abstractBackground: Smoking increases the risk of complications and related costs after an orthopaedic fracture. Research in other populations suggests that a one-time payment may incentivize smoking cessation. However, little is known on fracture patients' willingness to accept financial incentives to stop smoking; and the level of incentive required to motivate smoking cessation in this population. This study aimed to estimate the financial threshold required to motivate fracture patients to stop smoking after injury. Methods: This cross-sectional study utilized a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to elicit patient preferences towards financial incentives and reduced complications associated with smoking cessation. We presented participants with 12 hypothetical options with several attributes with varying levels. The respondents' data was used to determine the utility of each attribute level and the relative importance associated with each attribute. Results: Of the 130 enrolled patients, 79% reported an interest in quitting smoking. We estimated the financial incentive to be of greater relative importance (ri) (45%) than any of the included clinical benefits of smoking cessations (deep infection (ri: 24%), bone healing complications (ri: 19%), and superficial infections (ri: 12%)). A one-time payment of $800 provided the greatest utility to the respondents (0.64, 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.93), surpassing the utility associated with a single $1000 financial incentive (0.36, 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.55). Conclusions: Financial incentives may be an effective tool to promote smoking cessation in the orthopaedic trauma population. The findings of this study define optimal payment thresholds for smoking cessation programs.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s13561-021-00313-3en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Economics Reviewen_US
dc.subjectfinancial incentiveen_US
dc.subjectorthopedic trauma patientsen_US
dc.subjectshort-term smoking cessationen_US
dc.titleCan financial payments incentivize short-term smoking cessation in orthopaedic trauma patients? Evidence from a discrete choice experimenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13561-021-00313-3
dc.identifier.pmid33903947
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage15
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryGermany


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