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dc.contributor.authorCohee, Lauren M
dc.contributor.authorValim, Clarissa
dc.contributor.authorCoalson, Jenna E
dc.contributor.authorNyambalo, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorChilombe, Moses
dc.contributor.authorNgwira, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBauleni, Andy
dc.contributor.authorSeydel, Karl B
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Mark L
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Terrie E
dc.contributor.authorMathanga, Don P
dc.contributor.authorLaufer, Miriam K
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-08T18:29:16Z
dc.date.available2021-04-08T18:29:16Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-25
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/15123
dc.description.abstractIn areas where malaria remains entrenched, novel transmission-reducing interventions are essential for malaria elimination. We report the impact screening-and-treatment of asymptomatic Malawian schoolchildren (n = 364 in the rainy season and 341 in the dry season) had on gametocyte—the parasite stage responsible for human-to-mosquito transmission—carriage. We used concomitant household-based surveys to predict the potential reduction in transmission in the surrounding community. Among 253 students with P. falciparum infections at screening, 179 (71%) had infections containing gametocytes detected by Pfs25 qRT-PCR. 84% of gametocyte-containing infections were detected by malaria rapid diagnostic test. While the gametocyte prevalence remained constant in untreated children, treatment with artemether-lumefantrine reduced the gametocyte prevalence (p < 0.0001) from 51.8 to 9.7% and geometric mean gametocyte density (p = 0.008) from 0.52 to 0.05 gametocytes/microliter. In community surveys, 46% of all gametocyte-containing infections were in school-age children, who comprised only 35% of the population. Based on these estimates six weeks after the intervention, the gametocyte burden in the community could be reduced by 25–55% depending on the season and the measure used to characterize gametocyte carriage. Thus, school-based interventions to treat asymptomatic infections may be a high-yield approach to not only improve the health of schoolchildren, but also decrease malaria transmission.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAPC sponsored by UMB HSHSLen_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-86450-5en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reportsen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectParasite biologyen_US
dc.subjectMalariaen_US
dc.subjectPreventive medicineen_US
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPlasmodium falciparumen_US
dc.titleSchool-based screening and treatment may reduce P. falciparum transmissionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-021-86450-5
dc.identifier.pmid33767384
dc.source.volume11
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage6905
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-08T18:29:17Z
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryEngland


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International