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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Katherine L
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yan
dc.contributor.authorKuhn, Ann Pulling
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Maureen M
dc.contributor.authorHager, Erin R
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-07T18:11:54Z
dc.date.available2021-04-07T18:11:54Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-22
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/15112
dc.description.abstractBackground: Mothers of young children from low-income communities may be vulnerable to barriers associated with low physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between home environment factors and maternal physical activity among mothers of toddlers. Methods: Mothers of toddlers (n = 200) recruited from low-income communities simultaneously wore an ankle-placed accelerometer and were given a personal digital assistant for ecological momentary assessment. Mothers received randomly prompted questions about their current environment, activity, and social setting several times a day over eight consecutive days. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects regression models with random intercepts; within-group and between-group relations between physical activity and environment factors were disaggregated. Results: Within-group relations included higher physical activity counts for specific mothers with television off versus on (95% CI = 130.45, 199.17), children absent versus present (95% CI = 82.00, 3.43), engaging with a child versus not (95% CI = 52.66, 127.63), and outside versus inside location (95% CI = 277.74, 392.67). Between-group relations included higher physical activity on average when other adults were absent versus present (95% CI = − 282.63, − 46.95). Recruitment site (urban vs. semi-urban) significantly moderated the within-group relation between being outside versus inside and activity count (β = − 243.12, 95% CI = − 358.74, − 127.47), and showed stronger relations among urban mothers (β = 440.33, 95% CI = 358.41, 522.25), than semi-urban (β = 190.37, 95% CI = 109.64, 271.11). Maternal body weight significantly moderated the within-group relation between being located outside versus inside the home and activity count (β for interaction = − 188.67, 95% CI = − 308.95, − 68.39), with a stronger relation among mothers with normal weight (β = 451.62, 95% CI = 345.51, 557.73), than mothers with overweight/obesity (β = 271.95, 95% CI = 204.26, 339.64). Conclusions: This study highlights home environmental factors, including screen time, the presence of others (adults and children), and location (i.e., outside versus inside) that may relate to maternal physical activity behaviors. Understanding factors associated with physical activity could reduce physical activity disparities. Trial registry ClinicalTrials. NCT02615158, April 2006 © 2021, The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12905-021-01243-2en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC women's healthen_US
dc.subjectAssessmenten_US
dc.subjectEcological Momentaryen_US
dc.subjectMaternal Healthen_US
dc.subjectPhysical Activityen_US
dc.subjectPublic Healthen_US
dc.titleAn ecological momentary assessment study of physical activity behaviors among mothers of toddlers from low-income householdsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12905-021-01243-2
dc.identifier.pmid33752659
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage120
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryEngland


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