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dc.contributor.authorKhanna, Niharika
dc.contributor.authorKlyushnenkova, Elena N
dc.contributor.authorKaysin, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-16T12:52:50Z
dc.date.available2021-03-16T12:52:50Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/14970
dc.description.abstractCompared with white non-Hispanic patients, the odds of COVID-19 detection were higher in black non-Hispanic (odds ratio [OR] = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.18-2.59, P = .0052) and Hispanic patients (OR = 5.40; 95% CI, 3.11-9.38, P < .0001). The latent class analysis revealed additional patterns in health disparities. Patients living in the areas with Area Deprivation Index 8-10 who were predominantly black had higher risk for SARS CoV-2 infection compared with patients living in less socioeconomically deprived areas who were predominantly white (OR = 1.68; 95% CI, 1.25-2.28; P = .0007).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2021.S1.200338en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Board of Family Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFMen_US
dc.rights© Copyright 2021 by the American Board of Family Medicine.en_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19 Diagnostic Testingen_US
dc.subjectFamily Medicineen_US
dc.subjectHealth Information Exchangeen_US
dc.subjectLatent Class Analysisen_US
dc.subjectLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subjectMinority Groupsen_US
dc.titleAssociation of COVID-19 With Race and Socioeconomic Factors in Family Medicineen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3122/jabfm.2021.S1.200338
dc.identifier.pmid33622817
dc.source.volume34
dc.source.issueSuppl
dc.source.beginpageS40
dc.source.endpageS47
dc.source.countryUnited States


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