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dc.contributor.authorPinet-Peralta, Luis M
dc.contributor.authorGlos, Lukas J
dc.contributor.authorSanna, Evan
dc.contributor.authorFrankel, Brian
dc.contributor.authorLindqvist, Ernest
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-24T21:27:45Z
dc.date.available2021-02-24T21:27:45Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/14749
dc.description.abstractBackground: The provision of unnecessary Emergency Medical Services care remains a challenge throughout the US and contributes to Emergency Department overcrowding, delayed services and lower quality of care. New EMS models of care have shown promise in improving access to health services for patients who do not need urgent care. The goals of this study were (1) to identify factors associated with EMS utilization (911) and (2) their effects on total EMS calls and transports in an MIH program. Methods: The study sample included 110 MIH patients referred to the program or considered high-users of EMS services between November 2016 and September 2018. The study employed descriptive statistics and Poisson regressions to estimate the effects of covariates on total EMS calls and transports. Results: The typical enrollee is a 60-year-old single Black male living with two other individuals. He has a PCP, takes 12 medications and is compliant with his treatment. The likelihood of calling and/or being transported by EMS was higher for males, patients at high risk for falls, patients with asthma/COPD, psychiatric or behavioral illnesses, and longer travel times to a PCP. Each prescribed medication increased the risk for EMS calls or transports by 4%. The program achieved clear reductions in 911 calls and transports and savings of more than 140,000 USD in the first month. Conclusions: This study shows that age, marital status, high fall risk scores, the number of medications, psychiatric/behavioral illness, asthma/COPD, CHF, CVA/stroke and medication compliance may be good predictors of EMS use in an MIH setting. MIH programs can help control utilization of EMS care and reduce both EMS calls and transports. © 2021, The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12911-021-01409-wen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Medical Informatics and Decision Makingen_US
dc.subjectCommunityen_US
dc.subjectEmergencyen_US
dc.subjectEmergency healthen_US
dc.subjectHealth careen_US
dc.subjectMobile unitsen_US
dc.subjectPopulationen_US
dc.subjectProgram specialisten_US
dc.subjectServiceen_US
dc.titleEMS utilization predictors in a Mobile Integrated Health (MIH) program.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12911-021-01409-w
dc.identifier.pmid33541350
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage40
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryEngland


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