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dc.contributor.authorKochunov, Peter
dc.contributor.authorZavaliangos-Petropulu, Artemis
dc.contributor.authorJahanshad, Neda
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Paul M
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Meghann C
dc.contributor.authorChiappelli, Joshua
dc.contributor.authorChen, Shuo
dc.contributor.authorDu, Xiaoming
dc.contributor.authorHatch, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorAdhikari, Bhim
dc.contributor.authorSampath, Hemalatha
dc.contributor.authorHare, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorKvarta, Mark
dc.contributor.authorGoldwaser, Eric
dc.contributor.authorYang, Fude
dc.contributor.authorOlvera, Rene L
dc.contributor.authorFox, Peter T
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Joanne E
dc.contributor.authorBlangero, John
dc.contributor.authorGlahn, David C
dc.contributor.authorTan, Yunlong
dc.contributor.authorHong, L Elliot
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-11T20:41:09Z
dc.date.available2021-02-11T20:41:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/14682
dc.description.abstractSchizophrenia (SZ) is a severe psychiatric illness associated with an elevated risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Both SZ and AD have white matter abnormalities and cognitive deficits as core disease features. We hypothesized that aging in SZ patients may be associated with the development of cerebral white matter deficit patterns similar to those observed in AD. We identified and replicated aging-related increases in the similarity between white matter deficit patterns in patients with SZ and AD. The white matter "regional vulnerability index" (RVI) for AD was significantly higher in SZ patients compared with healthy controls in both the independent discovery (Cohen's d = 0.44, P = 1·10-5, N = 173 patients/230 control) and replication (Cohen's d = 0.78, P = 9·10-7, N = 122 patients/64 controls) samples. The degree of overlap with the AD deficit pattern was significantly correlated with age in patients (r = .21 and .29, P < .01 in discovery and replication cohorts, respectively) but not in controls. Elevated RVI-AD was significantly associated with cognitive measures in both SZ and AD. Disease and cognitive specificities were also tested in patients with mild cognitive impairment and showed intermediate overlap. SZ and AD have diverse etiologies and clinical courses; our findings suggest that white matter deficits may represent a key intersecting point for these 2 otherwise distinct diseases. Identifying mechanisms underlying this white matter deficit pattern may yield preventative and treatment targets for cognitive deficits in both SZ and AD patients.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbaa078en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Bulletinen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.en_US
dc.subjectAlzheimer’s diseaseen_US
dc.subjectdementiaen_US
dc.subjectschizophreniaen_US
dc.subjectwhite matter deficit patternen_US
dc.titleA White Matter Connection of Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's Diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/schbul/sbaa078
dc.identifier.pmid32681179
dc.source.volume47
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage197
dc.source.endpage206
dc.source.countryUnited States


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