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dc.contributor.authorChevignon, Germain
dc.contributor.authorForay, Vincent
dc.contributor.authorPérez-Jiménez, Mercedes Maria
dc.contributor.authorLibro, Silvia
dc.contributor.authorChung, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Jeremy M.
dc.contributor.authorLandmann, Frédéric
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-08T18:59:22Z
dc.date.available2021-02-08T18:59:22Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/14511
dc.description.abstractBrugia malayi is a human filarial nematode responsible for elephantiasis, a debilitating condition that is part of a broader spectrum of diseases called filariasis, including lymphatic filariasis and river blindness. Almost all filarial nematode species infecting humans live in mutualism with Wolbachia endosymbionts, present in somatic hypodermal tissues but also in the female germline which ensures their vertical transmission to the nematode progeny. These α-proteobacteria potentially provision their host with essential metabolites and protect the parasite against the vertebrate immune response. In the absence of Wolbachia wBm, B. malayi females become sterile, and the filarial nematode lifespan is greatly reduced. In order to better comprehend this symbiosis, we investigated the adaptation of wBm to the host nematode soma and germline, and we characterized these cellular environments to highlight their specificities. Dual RNAseq experiments were performed at the tissue-specific and ovarian developmental stage levels, reaching the resolution of the germline mitotic proliferation and meiotic differentiation stages. We found that most wBm genes, including putative effectors, are not differentially regulated between infected tissues. However, two wBm genes involved in stress responses are upregulated in the hypodermal chords compared to the germline, indicating that this somatic tissue represents a harsh environment to which wBm have adapted. A comparison of the B. malayi and C. elegans germline transcriptomes reveals a poor conservation of genes involved in the production of oocytes, with the filarial germline proliferative zone relying on a majority of genes absent from C. elegans. The first orthology map of the B. malayi genome presented here, together with tissue-specific expression enrichment analyses, indicate that the early steps of oogenesis are a developmental process involving genes specific to filarial nematodes, that likely result from evolutionary innovations supporting the filarial parasitic lifestyle.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008935en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen_US
dc.subjectWolbachia endosymbiontsen_US
dc.subject.meshBrugia malayi--geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, RNAen_US
dc.titleDual RNAseq analyses at soma and germline levels reveal evolutionary innovations in the elephantiasis-agent Brugia malayi, and adaptation of its Wolbachia endosymbiontsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0008935
dc.identifier.pmid33406151
dc.source.volume15
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpagee0008935
dc.source.endpage


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