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dc.contributor.authorXiong, Chenfeng
dc.contributor.authorHu, Songhua
dc.contributor.authorYang, Mofeng
dc.contributor.authorYounes, Hannah
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Weiyu
dc.contributor.authorGhader, Sepehr
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Lei
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-08T16:54:22Z
dc.date.available2021-01-08T16:54:22Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-16
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/14316
dc.description.abstractOne approach to delaying the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is to reduce human travel by imposing travel restriction policies. Understanding the actual human mobility response to such policies remains a challenge owing to the lack of an observed and large-scale dataset describing human mobility during the pandemic. This study uses an integrated dataset, consisting of anonymized and privacy-protected location data from over 150 million monthly active samples in the USA, COVID-19 case data and census population information, to uncover mobility changes during COVID-19 and under the stay-at-home state orders in the USA. The study successfully quantifies human mobility responses with three important metrics: daily average number of trips per person; daily average person-miles travelled; and daily percentage of residents staying at home. The data analytics reveal a spontaneous mobility reduction that occurred regardless of government actions and a 'floor' phenomenon, where human mobility reached a lower bound and stopped decreasing soon after each state announced the stay-at-home order. A set of longitudinal models is then developed and confirms that the states' stay-at-home policies have only led to about a 5% reduction in average daily human mobility. Lessons learned from the data analytics and longitudinal models offer valuable insights for government actions in preparation for another COVID-19 surge or another virus outbreak in the future.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rsif.2020.0344en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Royal Society, Interfaceen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectbehavioural responseen_US
dc.subjecthuman mobilityen_US
dc.subjectmobile device location dataen_US
dc.titleMobile device location data reveal human mobility response to state-level stay-at-home orders during the COVID-19 pandemic in the USAen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsif.2020.0344
dc.identifier.pmid33323055
dc.source.volume17
dc.source.issue173
dc.source.beginpage20200344
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryEngland


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