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dc.contributor.authorDareng, Eileen O.
dc.contributor.authorMa, Bing
dc.contributor.authorAdebamowo, Sally N.
dc.contributor.authorFamooto, Ayotunde
dc.contributor.authorRavel, Jacques
dc.contributor.authorPharoah, Paul P.
dc.contributor.authorAdebamowo, Clement A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-10T16:57:13Z
dc.date.available2020-11-10T16:57:13Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/14070
dc.description.abstractThe vaginal microbiota is thought to play a role in modulating risk of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection. We examined the relationship between the vaginal microbiota and persistent hrHPV infection in HIV-negative and HIV-positive women. We used 16S-rRNA sequencing to characterize the vaginal microbiota of two serial samples taken six months apart from 211 Nigerian women (67%, 142/211 HIV-positive and 33%, 69/211 HIV-negative) and evaluated the association between the vaginal microbiota and persistent hrHPV infection using generalized estimating equation logistic regression models and linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) algorithm to identify phylotypic biomarkers of persistent hrHPV infection. The high diversity microbiota, Community State Type IV-B, was the most prevalent in both HIV-negative (38% at baseline, 30% at the follow-up visit) and HIV-positive (27% at baseline, 35% at the follow-up visit) women. The relationship between the vaginal microbiota and persistent hrHPV was modified by HIV status. In HIV-negative women, women with Lactobacillus dominant microbiota had lower odds (OR: 0.35, 95% CI 0.14–0.89, p = 0.03) of persistent hrHPV compared to women with Lactobacillus deficient microbiota. While among HIV-positive women, the odds of being persistently infected with hrHPV was higher in women with Lactobacillus dominant microbiota (OR: 1.25, 95% CI 0.73–2.14 p = 0.41). This difference in effect estimates by HIV was statistically significant (p = 0.02). A high diversity vaginal microbial community with paucity of Lactobacillus species was associated with persistent hrHPV infection in HIV-negative women but not in HIV-positive women.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the UM-Capacity Development for Research in AIDS Associated Malignancy Grant (NIH/NCI 1D43CA153792-01); African Collaborative Center for Microbiome and Genomics Research Grant (NIH/NHGRI 1U54HG006947) from the the Office Of The Director, National Institutes Of Health (OD) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI); and funds through the Maryland Department of Health's Cigarette Restitution Fund Program.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-76003-7en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reportsen_US
dc.subject.meshVaginaen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrobiotaen_US
dc.subject.meshLactobacillusen_US
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen_US
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infectionsen_US
dc.subject.meshRNA, Ribosomal, 16Sen_US
dc.subject.meshNigeriaen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshDiscriminant Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshAlgorithmsen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomarkersen_US
dc.titleVaginal microbiota diversity and paucity of Lactobacillus species are associated with persistent hrHPV infection in HIV negative but not in HIV positive womenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-020-76003-7
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.issue1


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