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dc.contributor.authorBradwell, Katie R
dc.contributor.authorCoulibaly, Drissa
dc.contributor.authorKoné, Abdoulaye K
dc.contributor.authorLaurens, Matthew B
dc.contributor.authorDembélé, Ahmadou
dc.contributor.authorTolo, Youssouf
dc.contributor.authorTraoré, Karim
dc.contributor.authorNiangaly, Amadou
dc.contributor.authorBerry, Andrea A
dc.contributor.authorKouriba, Bourema
dc.contributor.authorPlowe, Christopher V
dc.contributor.authorDoumbo, Ogobara K
dc.contributor.authorLyke, Kirsten E
dc.contributor.authorTakala-Harrison, Shannon
dc.contributor.authorThera, Mahamadou A
dc.contributor.authorTravassos, Mark A
dc.contributor.authorSerre, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-16T14:24:15Z
dc.date.available2020-09-16T14:24:15Z
dc.date.issued2020-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/13714
dc.description.abstractChildren are highly susceptible to clinical malaria, and in regions where malaria is endemic, their immune systems must face successive encounters with Plasmodium falciparum parasites before they develop immunity, first against severe disease and later against uncomplicated malaria. Understanding cellular and molecular interactions between host and parasites during an infection could provide insights into the processes underlying this gradual acquisition of immunity, as well as to how parasites adapt to infect hosts that are successively more malaria experienced. Here, we describe methods to analyze the host and parasite gene expression profiles generated simultaneously from blood samples collected from five consecutive symptomatic P. falciparum infections in three Malian children. We show that the data generated enable statistical assessment of the proportions of (i) each white blood cell subset and (ii) the parasite developmental stages, as well as investigations of host-parasite gene coexpression. We also use the sequences generated to analyze allelic variations in transcribed regions and determine the complexity of each infection. While limited by the modest sample size, our analyses suggest that host gene expression profiles primarily clustered by individual, while the parasite gene expression profiles seemed to differentiate early from late infections. Overall, this study provides a solid framework to examine the mechanisms underlying acquisition of immunity to malaria infections using whole-blood transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq).IMPORTANCE We show that dual RNA-seq from patient blood samples allows characterization of host/parasite interactions during malaria infections and can provide a solid framework to study the acquisition of antimalarial immunity, as well as the adaptations of P. falciparum to malaria-experienced hosts.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1128/mSystems.00116-20en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofmSystemsen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Bradwell et al.en_US
dc.subjectmalariaen_US
dc.subjecttranscriptomicsen_US
dc.titleHost and Parasite Transcriptomic Changes upon Successive Plasmodium falciparum Infections in Early Childhooden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/mSystems.00116-20
dc.identifier.pmid32636334
dc.source.volume5
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.countryUnited States


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