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dc.contributor.authorHansen, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorBaum, Alina
dc.contributor.authorPascal, Kristen E
dc.contributor.authorRusso, Vincenzo
dc.contributor.authorGiordano, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorWloga, Elzbieta
dc.contributor.authorFulton, Benjamin O
dc.contributor.authorYan, Ying
dc.contributor.authorKoon, Katrina
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Krunal
dc.contributor.authorChung, Kyung Min
dc.contributor.authorHermann, Aynur
dc.contributor.authorUllman, Erica
dc.contributor.authorCruz, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorRafique, Ashique
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Tammy
dc.contributor.authorFairhurst, Jeanette
dc.contributor.authorLibertiny, Christen
dc.contributor.authorMalbec, Marine
dc.contributor.authorLee, Wen-Yi
dc.contributor.authorWelsh, Richard
dc.contributor.authorFarr, Glen
dc.contributor.authorPennington, Seth
dc.contributor.authorDeshpande, Dipali
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Jemmie
dc.contributor.authorWatty, Anke
dc.contributor.authorBouffard, Pascal
dc.contributor.authorBabb, Robert
dc.contributor.authorLevenkova, Natasha
dc.contributor.authorChen, Calvin
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Bojie
dc.contributor.authorRomero Hernandez, Annabel
dc.contributor.authorSaotome, Kei
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yi
dc.contributor.authorFranklin, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorSivapalasingam, Sumathi
dc.contributor.authorLye, David Chien
dc.contributor.authorWeston, Stuart
dc.contributor.authorLogue, James
dc.contributor.authorHaupt, Robert
dc.contributor.authorFrieman, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorChen, Gang
dc.contributor.authorOlson, William
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Andrew J
dc.contributor.authorStahl, Neil
dc.contributor.authorYancopoulos, George D
dc.contributor.authorKyratsous, Christos A
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-01T18:15:54Z
dc.date.available2020-09-01T18:15:54Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-21
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/13622
dc.description.abstractNeutralizing antibodies have become an important tool in treating infectious diseases. Recently, two separate approaches yielded successful antibody treatments for Ebola-one from genetically humanized mice and the other from a human survivor. Here, we describe parallel efforts using both humanized mice and convalescent patients to generate antibodies against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike protein, which yielded a large collection of fully human antibodies that were characterized for binding, neutralization, and three-dimensional structure. On the basis of these criteria, we selected pairs of highly potent individual antibodies that simultaneously bind the receptor binding domain of the spike protein, thereby providing ideal partners for a therapeutic antibody cocktail that aims to decrease the potential for virus escape mutants that might arise in response to selective pressure from a single-antibody treatment.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1126/science.abd0827en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScienceen_US
dc.subjectconvalescent humansen_US
dc.subjecthumanized miceen_US
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Neutralizingen_US
dc.subject.meshCOVID-19--prevention & controlen_US
dc.subject.meshSARS-CoV-2--immunologyen_US
dc.titleStudies in humanized mice and convalescent humans yield a SARS-CoV-2 antibody cocktailen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeOtheren_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/science.abd0827
dc.identifier.pmid32540901
dc.source.volume369
dc.source.issue6506
dc.source.beginpage1010
dc.source.endpage1014
dc.source.countryUnited States


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