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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Raymond M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDoshi, Peter
dc.contributor.authorHealy, David, 1954-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-31T14:54:46Z
dc.date.available2020-08-31T14:54:46Z
dc.date.issued24/08/2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/13597
dc.descriptionWith knowledge of covid-19 less than a year old, treatment remains fraught with uncertainty. Preprint data and adaptive clinical trials are imperfect but can guide active decision making in life-or-death situations, says Raymond M Johnson. But Peter Doshi and David Healy argue that doctors and professional societies should state that, without complete data transparency, they will not endorse covid-19 products as being based on science.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m3260en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBMJen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMJen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://bmj.com/coronavirus/usage
dc.subjectCoronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)en_US
dc.subjectdata transparencyen_US
dc.subject.lcshCOVID-19 (Disease)en_US
dc.subject.meshAdaptive Clinical Trials as Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Decision-Making--ethicsen_US
dc.subject.meshCOVID-19en_US
dc.subject.meshPreprints as Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshTherapeutics--standardsen_US
dc.titleCovid-19: Should doctors recommend treatments and vaccines when full data are not publicly available?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.m3260
dc.identifier.pii10.1136/bmj.m3260
dc.source.beginpagem3260
dc.identifier.eissn1756-1833


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