Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSolaiman, Anjana
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-21T15:18:06Z
dc.date.available2020-07-21T15:18:06Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/13353
dc.description.abstractProblem & Purpose: Neonatal asymptomatic hypoglycemia is a common problem that may contribute to poor health outcomes. Firstline treatment includes formula feeding, and/or transfer to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) for intravenous glucose. Both of these treatment options are sub-optimal because breastfeeding/bonding are disrupted, and costs may be increased due to NICU care. The purpose of this quality improvement (QI) project was to implement 40% buccal dextrose gel as the first line treatment of asymptomatic hypoglycemia in newborns at an academic medical center in the mid-Atlantic region to improve glycemic outcomes. Methods: This QI project was implemented during a 12-week period in the Fall of 2019. The target population included infants admitted to the newborn nursery who were less than 24 hours of life (HOL) with an identified risk factor for hypoglycemia (birthweight >3800 grams or <2500 grams, gestational age <37 weeks, LGA or SGA, or is an infant of diabetic mother), with asymptomatic hypoglycemia (blood glucose levels between 20- 40mg/dl). The QI project involved modifying the hospitals current neonatal hypoglycemia clinical practice guideline (CPG), to implement 40% dextrose gel as initial therapy in conjunction with feeding, developing an order set, creating documentation in the electronic health record, training personnel and collaborating with pharmacy to stock the gel. Results and Conclusions: During the implementation 16 newborns received glucose gel (N=16). Treatment success, defined as blood glucose levels >40mg/dL following the first and/or second administration of gel, was achieved in 87.5% of newborns. Newborns who did not respond favorably to glucose gel had an initial blood glucose level of <20mg/dL, a deviation from the modified CPG. Fifty five percent of newborns who were exclusively breastfeeding (N=9) received medically indicated formula supplementation. Five patients were transferred (N=5) to the NICU, 2 patients had achieved treatment success, but were unable to maintain adequate glycemic levels. Future QI cycles should include exploration of treatment failure with modifications to improve CPG adherence, consideration for increasing doses for responsive newborns as well widening the gestational age criteria. Overall the outcomes of this QI project demonstrated that glucose gel as the initial treatment for infants with asymptomatic hypoglycemia is effective.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectdextrose gelen_US
dc.subjectnewborn hypoglycemiaen_US
dc.subjectquality improvement projecten_US
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen_US
dc.subject.meshHypoglycemia--prevention & controlen_US
dc.titleImplementation of Dextrose gel for Asymptomatic Hypoglycemia in Newbornsen_US
dc.title.alternativeDextrose Gel for Asymptomatic Hypoglycemiaen_US
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWise, Barbara V.
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-21T15:18:07Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Solaiman_DextroseGel_2020.pdf
Size:
636.5Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record