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dc.contributor.authorCoker, M.O.
dc.contributor.authorMongodin, E.F.
dc.contributor.authorHittle, L.
dc.contributor.authorBlattner, W.A.
dc.contributor.authorCharurat, M.
dc.contributor.authorEl-Kamary, E.E.
dc.contributor.authorLangenberg, P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEnwonwu, C..en_US
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-15T19:33:28Z
dc.date.available2020-07-15T19:33:28Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85087306150&doi=10.1038%2fs41598-020-67487-4&partnerID=40&md5=c91b00b74f3b2f11346d48c13b4b1c34
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/13293
dc.description.abstractEven with antiretroviral therapy, children born to HIV-infected (HI) mothers are at a higher risk of early-life infections and morbidities including dental disease. The increased risk of dental caries in HI children suggest immune-mediated changes in oral bacterial communities, however, the impact of perinatal HIV exposure on the oral microbiota remains unclear. We hypothesized that the oral microbiota of HI and perinatally HIV-exposed-but-uninfected (HEU) children will significantly differ from HIV-unexposed-and-uninfected (HUU) children. Saliva samples from 286 child-participants in Nigeria, aged ≤ 6 years, were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Perinatal HIV infection was significantly associated with community composition (HI vs. HUU-p = 0.04; HEU vs. HUU-p = 0.11) however, immune status had stronger impacts on bacterial profiles (p < 0.001). We observed age-stratified associations of perinatal HIV exposure on community composition, with HEU children differing from HUU children in early life but HEU children becoming more similar to HUU children with age. Our findings suggest that, regardless of age, HIV infection or exposure, low CD4 levels persistently alter the oral microbiota during this critical developmental period. Data also indicates that, while HIV infection clearly shapes the developing infant oral microbiome, the effect of perinatal exposure (without infection) appears transient. Copyright 2020, The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research reported in this publication was supported by Fogarty AIDS International Training and Research Program (D43TW01041) and the National Institutes of Health (R01DE025174).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-67487-4en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNature Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports
dc.subjectHIV exposureen_US
dc.subjectimmune statusen_US
dc.subject.lcshChildrenen_US
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen_US
dc.subject.meshMouth--microbiologyen_US
dc.titleImmune status, and not HIV infection or exposure, drives the development of the oral microbiotaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-020-67487-4
dc.identifier.pmid32616727


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