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dc.contributor.authorLee, Kerry-Ann
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-15T13:25:00Z
dc.date.available2020-06-15T13:25:00Z
dc.date.issued2020en_us
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/13068
dc.description2020
dc.descriptionSocial Work
dc.descriptionUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore
dc.descriptionPh.D.
dc.description.abstractHistorically, Black men have been found to perpetrate IPV at higher rates in comparison to other ethnic groups; however, studies of IPV perpetration have largely focused on samples of White individuals. There is a paucity of empirical research related to the interrelationships among ACEs, IPV perpetration, and alcohol use among Black men. This study used data from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions. Study aims were: (1) to examine the interrelationships of ACEs, alcohol use, and IPV perpetration; to investigate whether alcohol use moderates the relationship between ACEs and IPV perpetration; and whether interpersonal social support moderates the relationships between ACEs and IPV perpetration and between alcohol use and IPV perpetration; (2) to determine if higher cumulative ACE score is associated with increased alcohol use and IPV perpetration; (3) to determine if racial discrimination is significantly associated with increased alcohol use and IPV perpetration; and (4) to identify how subgroups of ACEs (individually or in combination) are associated with alcohol use and IPV perpetration among Black men in adulthood. The sample consisted of 2,326 Black men aged ≥ 20 years. Bivariate results indicated an interrelationship among ACEs, alcohol use, and IPV perpetration. Regression analyses showed that alcohol use exacerbated the ACEs and IPV perpetration relationship for men with no ACEs; but for men who had a history of ACEs, the effect of alcohol on IPV was less substantial. Contrary to study hypotheses, higher interpersonal social support was found to buffer the relationship between ACEs and IPV perpetration for men with three ACEs, but exacerbated the alcohol use and IPV perpetration relationship. Higher cumulative ACE score was significantly associated with alcohol use and IPV perpetration. Racial discrimination was not significantly associated with study outcomes. Latent class analysis yielded three classes. Membership in classes 1 and 2 was associated with IPV perpetration; however, only class 1 membership was associated with alcohol use when compared to class 3 membership. Findings revealed factors that may contribute to IPV perpetration among a sample of Black men. Future research with Black men should aid in the development of culturally-appropriate interventions.
dc.subjectACEsen_us
dc.subjectalcohol useen_us
dc.subject.lcshIntimate partner violenceen_us
dc.subject.lcshMen, Blacken_us
dc.subject.lcshRace discriminationen_us
dc.subject.meshAdverse Childhood Experiencesen_us
dc.subject.meshAlcohol-Related Disordersen_us
dc.subject.meshSocial Supporten_us
dc.titleThe Interrelationships of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), Alcohol use in Adulthood, and Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Perpetration Among Black Men in the United Statesen_US
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.date.updated2020-06-04T16:03:32Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.contributor.advisorBright, Charlotte Lyn
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-15T13:25:01Z


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