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dc.contributor.authorWilkerson, R.G.
dc.contributor.authorAdler, J.D.
dc.contributor.authorShah, N.G.
dc.contributor.authorBrown, R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-08T20:21:01Z
dc.date.available2020-06-08T20:21:01Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85085346904&doi=10.1016%2fj.ajem.2020.05.044&partnerID=40&md5=f2bc4d64284df650bc954ca3f5d38630
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/12993
dc.description.abstractPatients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus can present with a wide variety of symptoms including being entirely asymptomatic. Despite having no or minimal symptoms, some patients may have markedly reduced pulse oximetry readings. This has been referred to as "silent" or "apathetic" hypoxia (Ottestad et al., 2020 [1]). We present a case of a 72-year-old male with COVID-19 syndrome who presented to the emergency department with minimal symptoms but low peripheral oxygen saturation readings. The patient deteriorated over the following days and eventually died as a result of overwhelming multi-organ system failure. This case highlights the utility of peripheral oxygen measurements in the evaluation of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Self-monitoring of pulse oximetry by patients discharged from the emergency department is a potential way to identify patients needing to return for further evaluation.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2020.05.044en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherW.B. Saundersen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectSilent hypoxiaen_US
dc.titleSilent hypoxia: A harbinger of clinical deterioration in patients with COVID-19en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ajem.2020.05.044


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