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dc.contributor.authorHarris, D.N.
dc.contributor.authorKessler, M.D.
dc.contributor.authorShetty, A.C.
dc.contributor.authorWeeks, D.E.
dc.contributor.authorMinster, R.L.
dc.contributor.authorBrowning, S.
dc.contributor.authorCochrane, E.E.
dc.contributor.authorDeka, R.
dc.contributor.authorHawley, N.L.
dc.contributor.authorReupena, M.S.
dc.contributor.authorNaseri, T.
dc.contributor.authorMcGarvey, S.T.
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, T.D.
dc.contributor.authorTrans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Consortium
dc.contributor.authorTOPMed Population Genetics Working Group
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-26T20:41:56Z
dc.date.available2020-05-26T20:41:56Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85084519440&doi=10.1073%2fpnas.1913157117&partnerID=40&md5=673e6fd0b32e7d8c0e57a0148fbc75a2
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/12820
dc.description.abstractArchaeological studies estimate the initial settlement of Samoa at 2,750 to 2,880 y ago and identify only limited settlement and human modification to the landscape until about 1,000 to 1,500 y ago. At this point, a complex history of migration is thought to have begun with the arrival of people sharing ancestry with Near Oceanic groups (i.e., Austronesian-speaking and Papuan-speaking groups), and was then followed by the arrival of non-Oceanic groups during European colonialism. However, the specifics of this peopling are not entirely clear from the archaeological and anthropological records, and is therefore a focus of continued debate. To shed additional light on the Samoan population history that this peopling reflects, we employ a population genetic approach to analyze 1,197 Samoan high-coverage whole genomes. We identify population splits between the major Samoan islands and detect asymmetrical gene flow to the capital city. We also find an extreme bottleneck until about 1,000 y ago, which is followed by distinct expansions across the islands and subsequent bottlenecks consistent with European colonization. These results provide for an increased understanding of Samoan population history and the dynamics that inform it, and also demonstrate how rapid demographic processes can shape modern genomes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NHLBI National Institutes of Health, NIH: R01-HL133040, U01 HL137181-01, T32CA154274, R01-HL093093 Marsden Fund: R35-HG010692-01, UOA1709 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NHLBIen_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1913157117en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
dc.subjectAustronesianen_US
dc.subjectFine-scale population structureen_US
dc.subjectGenetically understudied populationsen_US
dc.subjectOceaniaen_US
dc.subjectRare variantsen_US
dc.titleEvolutionary history of modern Samoansen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1913157117


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