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dc.contributor.authorChiappelli, J.
dc.contributor.authorRowland, L.M.
dc.contributor.authorWijtenburg, S.A.
dc.contributor.authorChen, H.
dc.contributor.authorMaudsley, A.A.
dc.contributor.authorSheriff, S.
dc.contributor.authorChen, S.
dc.contributor.authorSavransky, A.
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, W.
dc.contributor.authorRyan, M.C.
dc.contributor.authorBruce, H.A.
dc.contributor.authorShuldiner, A.R.
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, B.D.
dc.contributor.authorKochunov, P.
dc.contributor.authorHong, L.E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-26T20:41:55Z
dc.date.available2020-05-26T20:41:55Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85076351700&doi=10.1073%2fpnas.1907730116&partnerID=40&md5=e84c2de41a08d6feb00b0bf2a2530105
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/12817
dc.description.abstractCardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia and hypertension increase the risk for white matter pathology and cognitive decline. We hypothesize that white matter levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a chemical involved in the metabolic pathway for myelin lipid synthesis, could serve as a biomarker that tracks the influence of cardiovascular risk factors on white matter prior to emergence of clinical changes. To test this, we measured levels of NAA across white matter and gray matter in the brain using echo planar spectroscopic imaging (EPSI) in 163 individuals and examined the relationship of regional NAA levels and cardiovascular risk factors as indexed by the Framingham Cardiovascular Risk Score (FCVRS). NAA was strongly and negatively correlated with FCVRS across the brain, but, after accounting for age and sex, the association was found primarily in white matter regions, with additional effects found in the thalamus, hippocampus, and cingulate gyrus. FCVRS was also negatively correlated with creatine levels, again primarily in white matter. The results suggest that cardiovascular risks are related to neurochemistry with a predominantly white matter pattern and some subcortical and cortical gray matter involvement. NAA mapping of the brain may provide early surveillance for the potential subclinical impact of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors on the brain.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by NIH Grants K23MH112010, U01MH108148, R01MH116948, R01MH112180, R01MH094520, and P50 MH103222. The EPSI and MIDAS software are supported by NIH Grant R01EB016064.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1907730116en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
dc.subjectCreatineen_US
dc.subjectHypertensionen_US
dc.subjectNeurochemistryen_US
dc.subjectWhite matteren_US
dc.titleCardiovascular risks impact human brain Nacetylaspartate in regionally specific patternsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1907730116
dc.identifier.pmid31754041


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