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dc.contributor.authorPrasad, J.M.
dc.contributor.authorShipley, M.T.
dc.contributor.authorRogers, T.B.
dc.contributor.authorPuche, A.C.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-14T14:28:45Z
dc.date.available2020-04-14T14:28:45Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85082748889&doi=10.1057%2fs41599-020-0432-5&partnerID=40&md5=3abc523b5dadd1aee11f98cd36d5f635
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/12536
dc.description.abstractThe NIH is the major federal biomedical research funding agency within the United States, and NIH funding has become a priority in institutional decisions on faculty recruitment, salary, promotion, and tenure. The implicit assumption is that well-funded investigators will maintain their funding success; however, our analysis of NIH awardees from 2000 to 2015 suggests that regardless of how well funded an investigator is, their research portfolio exhibits "regression to the mean," matching the typical NIH funding profile within just 10-15 years. Thus, outperformance in past funding is not a strong predictor of future outperformance in funding success. This study indicates that faculty performance should not be solely judged upon grant success but should include other institutional mission priorities such as provision of clinical care, education, and service to community/profession. Copyright 2020, The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health, NIH: P50s, P01sen_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1057/s41599-020-0432-5en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPalgrave Macmillan Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPalgrave Communications
dc.subject.lcshNational Institutes of Health (U.S.)en_US
dc.subject.meshResearch Support as Topicen_US
dc.titleNational Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards: does past performance predict future success?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1057/s41599-020-0432-5


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