Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFarhadfar, N.
dc.contributor.authorHsu, J.W.
dc.contributor.authorYared, J.A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-03T15:58:17Z
dc.date.available2020-04-03T15:58:17Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85082202343&doi=10.1182%2fbloodadvances.2019000923&partnerID=40&md5=003c9101a6b3713c51ce458896051744
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/12484
dc.description.abstractThere are limited data on the effect of donor body mass index (BMI) on peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), especially in unrelated donors. Obesity has been associated with persistent leukocytosis, elevated circulating progenitor cells, and enhanced stem cell mobilization. Therefore, we hypothesized that adequate collection of CD341 cells may be achieved with lower doses (per kilogram of body weight) of G-CSF in donors with higher BMI compared with donors with lower BMI. Using the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research database, we evaluated the impact of donor BMI on G-CSF-mobilized PBSC yield in healthy unrelated donors. We examined 20 884 PBSC donations collected at National Marrow Donor Program centers between 2006 and 2016. We found significantly higher collection yields in obese and severely obese donors compared with normal and overweight donors. An increase in average daily G-CSF dose was associated with an increase in stem cell yield in donors with normal or overweight BMI. In contrast, an increase in average daily G-CSF dose beyond 780 mg per day in obese and 900 mg per day in severely obese donors did not increase cell yield. Pain and toxicities were assessed at baseline, during G-CSF administration, and postcollection. Obesity was associated with higher levels of self-reported donation-related pain and toxicities in the pericollection and early postdonation recovery periods. This study suggests a maximum effective G-CSF dose for PBSC mobilization in obese and severely obese donors, beyond which higher doses of G-CSF add no increased yield.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipPatient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, PCORI; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NHLBI; Gilead Sciences; University of Minnesota, UM; Swedish Orphan Biovitrum; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIAID; Karyopharm Therapeutics; Spectrum Pharmaceuticals; HistoGenetics; Bristol-Myers Squibb, BMS; National Institutes of Health, NIH: 1U24HL138660, 00014-17-1-2388, 250201700006C, 00014-17-1-2850, 00014-18-1-2045; National Cancer Institute, NCI; Amgen; Office of Naval Research, ONR; Shire; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NHLBI;en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000923en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Hematologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBlood Advances
dc.subjectmarrow donorsen_US
dc.subjectbody mass index procedureen_US
dc.subjecttoxic effecten_US
dc.subject.meshTransplantationen_US
dc.subject.meshGranulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factoren_US
dc.subject.meshHematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilizationen_US
dc.subject.meshObesityen_US
dc.subject.meshObesity, Morbiden_US
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Blood Stem Cellsen_US
dc.subject.meshOverweighten_US
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD34en_US
dc.titleWeighty choices: Selecting optimal G-CSF doses for stem cell mobilization to optimize yielden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1182/bloodadvances.2019000923
dc.identifier.pmid32092138


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record