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dc.contributor.authorGranieri, S.S.
dc.contributor.authorReitano, E.E.
dc.contributor.authorGupta, S.S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T20:14:24Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T20:14:24Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85081895945&doi=10.1186%2fs13017-020-00297-1&partnerID=40&md5=5e6760fae724246618bfec1333a1b813
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/12465
dc.description.abstractBackground: Motorcyclists are often victims of road traffic incidents. Though elderly patients seem to have worse survival outcomes and sustain more severe injuries than younger patients, concordance in the literature for this does not exist. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of age and injury severity on the mortality of patients undergoing motorcycle trauma. Methods: Data of 1725 patients consecutively admitted to our Trauma Center were selected from 2002 to 2016 and retrospectively analyzed. The sample was divided into three age groups: ≤ 17 years, 18-54 years, and ≤ 55 years. Mortality rates were analyzed for the overall population and patients with Injury Severity Score (ISS) ? 25. Differences in survival among age groups were evaluated with log-rank test, and multivariate logistic regression models were created to identify independent predictors of mortality. Results: A lower survival rate was detected in patients older than 55 years (83.6% vs 94.7%, p = 0.049) and in those sustaining critical injuries (ISS ≤ 25, 61% vs 83%, p = 0.021). Age (p = 0.027, OR 1.03), ISS (p < 0.001, OR 1.09), and Revised Trauma Score (RTS) (p < 0.001, OR 0.47) resulted as independent predictors of death. Multivariate analysis identified head (p < 0.001, OR 2.04), chest (p < 0.001, OR 1.54), abdominal (p < 0.001, OR 1.37), and pelvic (p = 0.014, OR 1.26) injuries as independent risk factors related to mortality as well. Compared to the theoretical probability of survival, patients of all age groups showed a survival advantage when managed at a level I trauma center. Conclusions: We detected anatomical injury distributions and mortality rates among three age groups. Patients aging more than 55 years had an increased risk of death, with a prevalence of severe chest injuries, while younger patients sustained more severe head trauma. Age represented an independent predictor of death. Management of these patients at a level I trauma center may lead to improved outcomes. Copyright 2020 The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s13017-020-00297-1en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofWorld Journal of Emergency Surgery
dc.subjectMotorcycleen_US
dc.subjectMotorcycle crashen_US
dc.subjectTraumaen_US
dc.subject.meshWounds and Injuries
dc.titleMotorcycle-related trauma:effects of age and site of injuries on mortality. A single-center, retrospective study.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13017-020-00297-1
dc.identifier.pmid32156286


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