• A Practical Decontamination Framework for COVID-19 Front-line Workers Returning Home

      Harris, Chelsea A.; Evans, Heather L.; Telem, Dana A. (Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health), 2020-05-07)
      The question, ‘‘how can I keep the people in my household safe?’’ points to a fundamental fear among health care workers and other essential employees. For those on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic, anxiety regarding virus transmission does not stop at shifts’ end. Instead, providers are grappling with how to ensure they do not bring infectious materials home. Few, if any, guidelines exist to advise personnel on how to best limit viral spread to their families, and most focus on how to limit transmission after individuals become infected. In this context, we have endeavored to synthesize scientific evidence, agency guidelines, and best practices from workers in the field, to create a framework for staff returning from work.
    • Self-Reported Symptoms of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Among Healthcare Workers in Ethiopia During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Cross-Sectional Study

      Jemal, Kemal; Deriba, Berhanu Senbeta; Geleta, Tinsae Abeya; Tesema, Mengistu; Awol, Mukemil; Mengistu, Endeshaw; Annous, Youssef (Dove Press, 2021-05-06)
      Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a public health emergency that has affected many world nations, including Ethiopia. Aside from its implications on the community as a whole, COVID-19 has also been associated with a variety of mental health problems among healthcare workers (HCWs). In this study, we aim to assess the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress during the COVID-19 pandemic among HCWs in central Ethiopia. Methods: An institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted using an online survey from June 25, 2020, to July 25, 2020, in Ethiopia. Data were collected using a self-reported Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). Data were cleaned, coded, and analysed using SPSS Version 23. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was done to identify the associated factors for mental health outcomes at a p-value of less than 0.05. Results: A total of 816 HCWs completed the self-report questionnaire. The percentage of HCWs who had moderate to extremely severe symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress were 60.3%, 78%, and 33.8%, respectively. Female participants, HCWs in the Oromiya Special Zone, medical laboratory professionals, and HCWs working in the COVID-19 treatment isolation centers were significantly more likely to have symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. Conclusion: In this study, HCWs reported a high prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. Female participants, HCWs in the Oromiya Special Zone, medical laboratory professionals, and HCWs working in the COVID-19 treatment isolation centers were significantly more likely to have symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. It is imperative that the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health should develop psychological interventions to address the specific needs of HCWs who have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.