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dc.contributor.authorPapali, A.
dc.contributor.authorAdhikari, N.K.J.
dc.contributor.authorDiaz, J.V.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-18T17:07:49Z
dc.date.available2020-02-18T17:07:49Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85079107350&doi=10.1007%2f978-3-030-03143-5_3&partnerID=40&md5=626e1ad933e3262c321030f454954001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/12032
dc.description.abstracten_US
dc.description.abstractIn this chapter, we provide guidance on some basic structural requirements, focusing on organization, staffing, and infrastructure. We suggest a closed-format intensive care unit (ICU) with dedicated physicians and nurses, specifically trained in intensive care medicine whenever feasible. Regarding infrastructural components, a reliable electricity supply is essential, with adequate backup systems. Facilities for oxygen therapy are crucial, and the choice between oxygen concentrators, cylinders, and a centralized system depends on the setting. For use in mechanical ventilators, a centralized piped system is preferred. Facilities for proper hand hygiene are essential. Alcohol-based solutions are preferred, except in the context of Ebola virus disease (chloride-based solutions) and Clostridium difficile infection (soap and water). Availability of disposable gloves is important for self-protection; for invasive procedures masks, caps, sterile gowns, sterile drapes, and sterile gloves are recommended. Caring for patients with highly contagious infectious diseases requires access to personal protective equipment. Basic ICU equipment should include vital signs monitors and mechanical ventilators, which should also deliver noninvasive ventilator modes. We suggest that ICUs providing invasive ventilatory support have the ability to measure end-tidal carbon dioxide and if possible can perform blood gas analysis. We recommend availability of glucometers and capabilities for measuring blood lactate. We suggest implementation of bedside ultrasound as diagnostic tool. Finally, we recommend proper administration of patient data; suggest development of locally applicable bundles, protocols, and checklists for the management of sepsis; and implement systematic collection of quality and performance indicators to guide improvements in ICU performance.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-03143-5_3en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishingen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSepsis Management in Resource-limited Settings
dc.subjectinfrastructureen_US
dc.subject.lcshOrganizationen_US
dc.subject.meshIntensive Care Unitsen_US
dc.subject.meshHealthcare Disparitiesen_US
dc.titleInfrastructure and organization of adult intensive care units in resource-limited settingsen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-030-03143-5_3


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