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dc.contributor.authorDubowitz, H.
dc.contributor.authorZuravin, S.
dc.contributor.authorStarr, R.H., Jr.
dc.contributor.authorFeigelman, S.
dc.contributor.authorHarrington, D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T23:56:19Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T23:56:19Z
dc.date.issued1993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11971
dc.description.abstractAn increasing number of children needing out-of-home care are being placed with relatives. Despite this pervasive policy, there has been scant research on children in this arrangement called kinship care. The objectives of this study were (1) to assess the behavior of children in kinship care and (2) to identify predictors of their behavior. The caregivers of 346 children in kinship care completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Background information was obtained from caregivers and caseworkers. Forty-two percent of boys and 28% of girls had overall CBCL scores in the clinical range, compared with an expected 10% in the general population. Logistic regressions revealed several variables significantly associated with behavior problems including: Reason for placement, gender, race, caregiver's perception of the child, caregiver's educational level, number of contacts between caregiver and caseworker, long-term plan, and child's age. The frequent behavior problems among these high-risk children in kinship care suggest they all deserve mental health evaluations; at a minimum, periodic screening is indicated. Copyright 1993 by Williams & Wilkins.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectFoster careen_US
dc.subjectKinship careen_US
dc.titleBehavior problems of children in kinship careen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi
dc.identifier.pmid8126231
dc.identifier.ispublishedYes
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