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dc.contributor.authorDubowitz, H.
dc.contributor.authorZuckerman, D.M.
dc.contributor.authorBithoney, W.G.
dc.contributor.authorNewberger, E.H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T23:56:18Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T23:56:18Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11963
dc.description.abstractSimilar theories of etiology have been postulated for child abuse and nonorganic failure to thrive (FTT). This study compared individual, familial, and environmental conditions in cases of child abuse to cases of FTT. Assessment of the mother's childhood home, supports, current living situation, attitudes toward her child, and child characteristics (such as temperament, social maturity, and complicating medical conditions) showed the groups to be remarkably alike. The major significant difference was that although both groups were poor, the abuse group was even more impoverished and lived in more crowded conditions than the families with a child with FTT. These data suggest a common etiologic context for different pediatric social illnesses and the need for a broad collaborative approach by pediatricians and colleagues in related disciplines.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Publishing (US)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofViolence and Victims
dc.titleChild abuse and failure to thrive: Individual, familial, and environmental characteristicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.pmid2487134
dc.identifier.ispublishedYes
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