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dc.contributor.authorLane, W.G.
dc.contributor.authorDubowitz, H.
dc.contributor.authorLangenberg, P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T21:37:17Z
dc.date.available2020-02-07T21:37:17Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-71949122962&doi=10.1542%2fpeds.2009-0904&partnerID=40&md5=91bf27434a387db0e1bf1f52cee15ed4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11871
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: The goals were (1) to determine the prevalence of occult abdominal trauma (OAT) in a sample of children with suspected physical abuse, (2) to assess the frequency of OAT screening, and (3) to assess factors associated with screening. METHODS: Charts of children evaluated for abusive injury were identified through a search of hospital discharge codes. Identified charts were reviewed to determine whether OAT screening occurred. Data on results of screening tests, abusive injuries identified, family demographic features, and characteristics of the emergency department visit were collected. RESULTS: Screening occurred for 51 (20%) of 244 eligible children. Positive results were identified for 41% of those screened and 9% of the total sample; 5% of children 12 to 23 months of age had OAT identified through imaging studies. Screening occurred more often in children presenting with probable abusive head trauma (odds ratio [OR]: 20.4 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.6-114.6]; P < .01), compared with those presenting with other injuries. Consultation with the child protection team (OR: 8.5 [95% CI: 3.5-20.7]; P < .01) and other subspecialists (OR: 24.3 [95% CI: 7.1-83.3]; P < .01) also increased the likelihood that OAT screening would occur. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support OAT screening with liver and pancreatic enzyme measurements for physically abused children. This study also supports the importance of subspecialty input, especially that of a child protection team. Although many identified injuries may not require treatment, their role in confirming or demonstrating increased severity of maltreatment may be critical. Copyright 2009 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2009-0904en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatricsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPediatrics
dc.subjectAbdominal traumaen_US
dc.subjectChild abuseen_US
dc.subjectScreeningen_US
dc.titleScreening for occult abdominal trauma in children with suspected physical abuseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2009-0904
dc.identifier.pmid19933726
dc.identifier.ispublishedYes
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