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dc.contributor.authorBecker, A.
dc.contributor.authorDubose, J.
dc.contributor.authorIsrael Trauma Group
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T16:19:39Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T16:19:39Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85078467865&doi=10.1016%2fj.cjtee.2019.09.002&partnerID=40&md5=844883da6b3f05a51e79a226cb531604
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11669
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Pelvic fracture evaluation with abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) and formal CT cystography for rule out of urine bladder injury have been commonly employed in pediatric trauma patients. The additional delayed imaging required to obtain optimal CT cystography is, however, associated with increased doses of ionizing radiation to pelvic organs and represent a significant risk in the pediatric population for future carcinogenic risk. We hypothesized that avoidance of routine CT cystography among pediatric pelvic fracture victims would not result in an appreciable rate of missed bladder injuries and would aid in mitigating the radiation exposure risk associated with these additional images. Methods: A retrospective cohort study involving blunt trauma pelvic fractures among pediatric trauma patients (age<14) between the years 1997 and 2016 was conducted utilizing the Israeli National Trauma Registry. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS statistical software version 9.4 via the tests of Chi-square test and two-sided Fisher's exact test. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 1072 children were identified from the registry for inclusion. Mean age of patients was 7.7 years (range 0–14) and 713 (66.5%) were male. Overall mortality in this population was 4.1% (44/1072). Only 2.1% (23) of pediatric patients with pelvic fractures had bladder injury identified, with just 9 children having intraperitoneal bladder rupture (0.8% of all the patients). Conclusion: The vast majority of blunt pediatric trauma victims with pelvic fractures do not have urine bladder injuries. Based on our study results we do not recommend the routine utilization of CT cystography in this unique population.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.cjtee.2019.09.002en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Journal of Traumatology - English Edition
dc.subjectBladder injuryen_US
dc.subjectChilden_US
dc.subjectCystographyen_US
dc.subjectPelvic fractureen_US
dc.subjectTomography X-ray computeden_US
dc.titleIs computed tomography cystography indicated in children with pelvic fractures?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cjtee.2019.09.002


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