• Effectiveness and safety of rivaroxaban versus warfarin among nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients with obesity and diabetes

      Weir, Matthew R; Chen, Yen-Wen; He, Jinghua; Bookhart, Brahim; Campbell, Alicia; Ashton, Veronica (Elsevier Ltd., 2021-09-04)
      Aims: To compare clinical outcomes of rivaroxaban and warfarin in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and concurrent obesity and diabetes. Methods: Patients aged ≥18 years were identified from a healthcare claims database with the following criteria: newly initiating rivaroxaban or warfarin, ≥1 medical claim with a diagnosis of AF, obesity determined by validated machine learning algorithm, and ≥1 claim with a diagnosis of diabetes or for antidiabetic medication. Treatment cohorts were matched using propensity scores and were compared for stroke/systemic embolism (SE) and major bleeding using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: A total of 9999 matched pairs of NVAF patients with obesity and diabetes who initiated treatment with rivaroxaban or warfarin were included. The composite risk of stroke/SE was significantly lower in the rivaroxaban cohort compared with the warfarin cohort (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.74-0.90). Risks of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were also significantly reduced with rivaroxaban versus warfarin, but not SE. Major bleeding risk was similar between treatment cohorts (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.78-1.09). Conclusions: In NVAF patients with comorbidities of obesity and diabetes, rivaroxaban was associated with lower risks of stroke/SE and similar risk of major bleeding versus warfarin.
    • Healthcare Resource Utilization and Costs of Rivaroxaban Versus Warfarin Among Nonvalvular Atrial Fibrillation Patients with Obesity and Diabetes

      Weir, Matthew R; Chen, Yen-Wen; He, Jinghua; Bookhart, Brahim; Campbell, Alicia; Ashton, Veronica (Springer Nature, 2021-10-26)
      Introduction: Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is associated with a substantial economic burden, particularly in patients with comorbid conditions. This study compared healthcare resource utilization (HRU) and costs of rivaroxaban and warfarin in patients with NVAF, obesity, and diabetes. Methods: A de-identified healthcare claims database was used to identify adult patients newly initiating rivaroxaban or warfarin and having at least one medical claim with a diagnosis of AF, obesity determined by validated algorithm, and at least one claim with a diagnosis of diabetes or for antidiabetic medication from December 2011 to March 2020. Propensity score matching was used to balance the treatment cohorts on the basis of demographics and baseline characteristics. All-cause and NVAF-related HRU rates and costs were compared between treatments using rate ratios, and mean cost differences were calculated on a per patient per year (PPPY) basis. Results: A total of 9999 matched pairs of patients with NVAF, obesity, and diabetes were identified in the rivaroxaban and warfarin cohorts. Rate ratios of all-cause HRU were significantly reduced with rivaroxaban versus warfarin in all healthcare settings evaluated, except emergency room visits. The greatest impact was on physician office visits followed by hospital outpatient and inpatient visits. NVAF-related HRU was significantly lower for rivaroxaban versus warfarin in all care settings. Consistent with these findings, the length of hospital stay was significantly reduced by approximately 4 days among all patients for both all-cause and NVAF-related hospitalizations in the rivaroxaban cohort compared with the warfarin cohort. Rivaroxaban was associated with reductions in all-cause total healthcare costs by more than $5000 PPPY and NVAF-related medical costs by approximately $1100 PPPY. Conclusion: In comparison with warfarin, rivaroxaban reduced HRU and costs, particularly hospital inpatient and outpatient visits and physician office visits, in patients with NVAF and comorbidities of obesity and diabetes.