Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKong, E.F.
dc.contributor.authorTsui, C.
dc.contributor.authorKucharíková, S.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T12:49:36Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T12:49:36Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85035056678&doi=10.1128%2fAAC.01573-17&partnerID=40&md5=c0a8c2cfb07328ccb846c814a91f411c
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11297
dc.description.abstractIn microbial biofilms, microorganisms utilize secreted signaling chemical molecules to coordinate their collective behavior. Farnesol is a quorum sensing molecule secreted by the fungal species Candida albicans and shown to play a central physiological role during fungal biofilm growth. Our pervious in vitro and in vivo studies characterized an intricate interaction between C. albicans and the bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, as these species coexist in biofilm. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of farnesol on S. aureus survival, biofilm formation, and response to antimicrobials. The results demonstrated that in the presence of exogenously supplemented farnesol or farnesol secreted by C. albicans in biofilm, S. aureus exhibited significantly enhanced tolerance to antimicrobials. By using gene expression studies, S. aureus mutant strains, and chemical inhibitors, the mechanism for the enhanced tolerance was attributed to upregulation of drug efflux pumps. Importantly, we showed that sequential exposure of S. aureus to farnesol generated a phenotype of high resistance to antimicrobials. Based on the presence of intracellular reactive oxygen species upon farnesol exposure, we hypothesize that antimicrobial tolerance in S. aureus may be mediated by farnesol-induced oxidative stress triggering the upregulation of efflux pumps, as part of a general stress response system. Hence, in mixed biofilms, C. albicans may influence the pathogenicity of S. aureus through acquisition of a drug-tolerant phenotype, with important therapeutic implications. Understanding interspecies signaling in polymicrobial biofilms and the specific drug resistance responses to secreted molecules may lead to the identification of novel targets for drug development.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the NIH under award number R01AI130170 to Mary Ann Jabra-Rizk and by the Interuniversity Attraction Poles Programme initiated by the Belgian Science Policy Office to Patrick Van Dijck and Mary Ann Jabra-Rizk. This work utilized an EM sample preparation instrument that was purchased with funding from a National Institutes of Health SIG grant (1S10RR26870-1) awarded to the University of Maryland, Baltimore.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01573-17en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
dc.subjectC. albicansen_US
dc.subjectDrug resistanceen_US
dc.subjectMicrobial biofilmsen_US
dc.subjectQuorum sensingen_US
dc.subjectS. aureusen_US
dc.subjectSecreted moleculesen_US
dc.titleModulation of Staphylococcus aureus response to antimicrobials by the Candida albicans quorum sensing molecule farnesolen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/AAC.01573-17
dc.identifier.pmid28893777


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record