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dc.contributor.authorHersh, D.S.
dc.contributor.authorHoover-Fong, J.E.
dc.contributor.authorBeck, N.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-01T12:49:35Z
dc.date.available2019-11-01T12:49:35Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85021805125&doi=10.3171%2f2017.2.PEDS16710&partnerID=40&md5=c61e562dd8752531478dab09d4062691
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11286
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE Recent reports have described early endoscopic suturectomy as a treatment option for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis, but such patients often require subsequent calvarial remodeling. The authors describe their experience with this patient population and seek to identify predictors of sufficiency of endoscopic surgery alone. METHODS The medical records of patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent endoscopic repair were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data, operative details, and follow-up data were collected. RESULTS A total of 6 patients with syndromic craniosynostosis underwent endoscopic surgery followed by helmet therapy during the study period. Of these, 3 patients were male. The involved syndromes included Crouzon, Pfeiffer, Jackson-Weiss, Muenke, Saethre-Chotzen, and craniosynostosis-3 (n = 1 each). The patients underwent endoscopic surgery at a median age of 2.1 months (range 0.9-4.1 months). The median estimated blood loss was 30 ml (range 20-100 ml), with 2 patients requiring a transfusion. The median length of stay in the hospital was 1.5 days (range 1-4 days), and the median follow-up was 29.0 months (range 16.8-81.7 months), with 1 patient (16.7%) requiring an open revision. Three patients (50%) were classified as Whitaker Category I at the last follow-up. The patients for whom additional open surgery was performed or recommended (Whitaker Category IV) were the oldest patients in the cohort, ranging from 2.6 to 4.1 months at the time of surgery. CONCLUSIONS This series demonstrates that endoscopic surgery can be sufficient to treat syndromic craniosynostosis without subsequent open calvarial remodeling over a median follow-up period of at least 2 years. The findings suggest that younger age at the time of endoscopic surgery may be an important factor in determining the sufficiency of this procedure. Even among patients who require subsequent open calvarial remodeling, early endoscopic surgery may allow for growth and development of the brain and skull while delaying the need for open remodeling until the patient is older and can better tolerate the procedure.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3171/2017.2.PEDS16710en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Neurological Surgeonsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
dc.subjectCoronalen_US
dc.subjectCraniofacialen_US
dc.subjectCraniosynostosisen_US
dc.subjectEndoscopicen_US
dc.subjectSyndromicen_US
dc.titleEndoscopic surgery for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis and the requirement for additional open surgeryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3171/2017.2.PEDS16710
dc.identifier.pmid28474983


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