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dc.contributor.authorHaachambwa, L.
dc.contributor.authorKandiwo, N.
dc.contributor.authorZulu, P.M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-31T12:24:21Z
dc.date.available2019-10-31T12:24:21Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85073565294&doi=10.1093%2fofid%2fofz336&partnerID=40&md5=6cb71747ffc647e912215671ad22bd14
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11239
dc.description.abstractBackground: We characterized the extent of antiretroviral therapy (ART) experience and postdischarge mortality among hospitalized HIV-infected adults in Zambia. Methods: At a central hospital with an opt-out HIV testing program, we enrolled HIV-infected adults (18+ years) admitted to internal medicine using a population-based sampling frame. Critically ill patients were excluded. Participants underwent a questionnaire regarding their HIV care history and CD4 count and viral load (VL) testing. We followed participants to 3 months after discharge. We analyzed prior awareness of HIV-positive status, antiretroviral therapy (ART) use, and VL suppression (VS; <1000 copies/mL). Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we assessed risk factors for mortality. Results: Among 1283 adults, HIV status was available for 1132 (88.2%), and 762 (67.3%) were HIV-positive. In the 239 who enrolled, the median age was 36 years, 59.7% were women, and the median CD4 count was 183 cells/mm3. Active tuberculosis or Cryptococcus coinfection was diagnosed in 82 (34.3%); 93.3% reported prior awareness of HIV status, and 86.2% had ever started ART. In the 64.0% with >6 months on ART, 74.4% had VS. The majority (92.5%) were discharged, and by 3 months, 48 (21.7%) had died. Risk of postdischarge mortality increased with decreasing CD4, and there was a trend toward reduced risk in those treated for active tuberculosis. Conclusions: Most HIV-related hospitalizations and deaths may now occur among ART-experienced vs-naïve individuals in Zambia. Development and evaluation of inpatient interventions are needed to mitigate the high risk of death in the postdischarge period. Copyright 2019 The Author(s) 2019.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease at the US National Institutes of Health through the University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for AIDS Research (P30AI027767 to J.M.T., M.J.M., and M.J.V.). M.J.V. also received support from the Fogarty International Center (K01TW009998).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1093/ofid/ofz336en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOxford Academic
dc.relation.ispartofOpen Forum Infectious Diseases
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectcare continuumen_US
dc.subjecthealth systemsen_US
dc.subjectHIV infectionen_US
dc.subjecthospitalizationen_US
dc.titleCare Continuum and Postdischarge Outcomes among HIV-Infected Adults Admitted to the Hospital in Zambiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ofid/ofz336
dc.identifier.pmidOxford University Press


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