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dc.contributor.authorKatbi, M.
dc.contributor.authorAdegboye, A.A.
dc.contributor.authorGumel, A.G.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-03T14:14:46Z
dc.date.available2019-10-03T14:14:46Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85072619162&doi=10.1016%2fj.ijid.2019.08.014&partnerID=40&md5=6254cdc5e8865b8269421016a3fb689e
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11041
dc.description.abstractBackground: Community Treatment Initiative (CTI) was developed in northern Nigeria as an intervention to link a cohort of people living with HIV (PLHIV) who refused antiretroviral treatment through a conventional linkage method to care and treatment. The CTI attempted to take treatment to PLHIV in the community. Methods: This was a non-control interventional study that evaluated the proportion of linkage-resistant PLHIV linked to treatment through the CTI in nine geographical areas. Data were collected between October and December 2015. Linkage-resistant PLHIV were identified and linked to treatment using the CTI. Data were analyzed using Excel and IBM SPSS version 20.0. The simple proportion was used to estimate the linkage-resistant PLHIV who were eventually linked and retained in care and who ultimately achieved virological suppression (viral load <1000 copies/ml). The Chi-square test was used and the level of significance set at a p-value of <0.05. Results: An estimated 541 (20%) PLHIV (239 (44.2%) male, 302 (55.8%) female) seen from October to December 2015 refused linkage to treatment. This was statistically significant at a p-value of <0.0001. Three hundred and seventy-seven (69.7%) of the PLHIV who refused linkage to treatment eventually accepted treatment using an alternative community treatment method; this was significant (p < 0.0001). The 6-month retention rate for PLHIV who accepted the alternative treatment method was 88.1% (n = 332); this was significant (p < 0.0001). Seventy-eight percent of those retained in care attained virological suppression. Conclusions: The CTI improved linkage to care and treatment for a cohort of linkage-resistant PLHIV. Focus on this cohort of linkage-resistant positive clients is required to achieve HIV epidemic control.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The grant for this project was made to the Institute of Human Virology Nigeria through the CDC to implement a scale-up project that will demonstrate HIV epidemic control in nine local government areas (LGAs) in two states (Benue and Nasarawa) and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2019.08.014en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
dc.subjectAntiretroviral therapyen_US
dc.subjectCommunityen_US
dc.subjectCTIen_US
dc.subjectHIVen_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectLinkageen_US
dc.subjectUptakeen_US
dc.titleEffect of community treatment initiative on antiretroviral therapy uptake among linkage-resistant people living with HIV in Northern Nigeriaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijid.2019.08.014
dc.identifier.pmid31446175


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