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dc.contributor.authorAkram, F.
dc.contributor.authorStiller, J.W.
dc.contributor.authorPostolache, T.T.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-27T19:29:59Z
dc.date.available2019-09-27T19:29:59Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85072380442&doi=10.1515%2fpteridines-2019-0016&partnerID=40&md5=955b31252c41f571330782e5367f8c78
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/11031
dc.description.abstractSummer/spring-type seasonal affective disorder (S-SAD) is the less common subtype of seasonal affective disorder and evidence regarding potential triggers of S-SAD is scarce. Recent reports support association of airborne-pollen with seasonal exacerbation of depression (mood seasonality) and timing of suicidal behavior. Therefore, we hypothesized that Old Order Amish (OOA) with summer/spring pattern of seasonality (abbreviated as summer pattern) and S-SAD will have significant mood worsening on high pollen days. Methods: A seasonal pattern of mood worsening and SAD parameters were estimated using Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). Age- and gender-adjusted AncOVAs and post hoc analyses were conducted to compare mood worsening on days with high pollen counts between summer-pattern vs no-summer-pattern of mood worsening, S-SAD vs no-S-SAD, winter-pattern vs no-winter-pattern of mood worsening, and W-SAD vs no-W-SAD groups. Results: The prevalence of S-SAD was 0.4%, while 4.5% of individuals had a summer pattern of mood seasonality. A statistically significant difference for mood worsening on high pollen days was observed between summer-pattern vs no-summer-pattern of mood worsening (p = 0.006). The significant association between S-SAD vs no-SAD groups (p = 0.032) for mood worsening on high pollen days did not withstand Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons. no significant association was found for winter-pattern vs no-winter-pattern of mood worsening (p = 0.61) and for W-SAD vs no-W-SAD (p = 0.19) groups. conclusion: Our results are consistent with previous studies implicating links between aeroallergen exposure and summer pattern of seasonality, but not the winter pattern of seasonality. Copyright 2019 Faisal Akram et al., published by De Gruyter 2019.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health under the K18MH093940 (PI Postolache).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1515/pteridines-2019-0016en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherDe Gruyteren_US
dc.relation.ispartofPteridines
dc.subjectAeroallergenen_US
dc.subjectMood Disorderen_US
dc.subjectOld Order Amishen_US
dc.subjectSeasonalityen_US
dc.subjectSummer SADen_US
dc.titleMood Worsening on Days with High Pollen counts is associated with a Summer Pattern of Seasonalityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/pteridines-2019-0016


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