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dc.contributor.authorGee, N.R.
dc.contributor.authorReed, T.
dc.contributor.authorFriedmann, E.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-14T14:28:33Z
dc.date.available2019-09-14T14:28:33Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85071608592&doi=10.3390%2fijerph16173113&partnerID=40&md5=042b668e6ad559b9cf52ea20737b5d99
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10833
dc.description.abstractAlthough fish and other aquatic species are popular privately-kept pets, little is known about the effects of watching live fish on the perceptions of arousal and the link between those perceptions and physiological measures of arousal. In two separate experiments, participants were asked to watch identically-equipped fish tanks for five minutes in each of three conditions: (1) Live fish, (2) plants and water, and (3) empty tank. Linear mixed models used across both experiments revealed similar results: Greater perceptions of relaxation and mood, and less anxiety during or after viewing the live fish condition, compared with the other conditions. Heart rate and heart rate variability responded to the arousal associated with a math task, but did not differ consistently across viewing conditions. These results suggest that the link between perceptions of arousal, and the physiological measures associated with arousal, may not be strong or immediate, or that heart rate and heart rate variability may not be appropriate measures for the test population. Implications of these results for the biophilia hypothesis and the biopsychosocial model are discussed. Copyright 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173113en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherMDPI AGen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
dc.subjectHealth benefits of companion animalsen_US
dc.subjectHuman-animal interactionsen_US
dc.subjectPsychological benefits of aquarium fishen_US
dc.titleObserving live fish improves perceptions of mood, relaxation and anxiety, but does not consistently alter heart rate or heart rate variabilityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph16173113
dc.identifier.pmid31461881


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