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dc.contributor.authorDel Bene Davis, Allison
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-12T15:49:01Z
dc.date.available2012-03-12T15:49:01Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/1081
dc.descriptionUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore. Nursing. Ph.D. 2006en_US
dc.description.abstractPeople with developmental disabilities are recognized as a vulnerable population and are frequently at increased risk due to their physical, social, economic and societal disparities. Despite these vulnerabilities, the regulations that govern community-based residential settings for the developmentally disabled provide little oversight with regard to home environmental health hazards such as lead, mercury, carbon monoxide, pesticides, radon and volatile organic compounds. Minimal data are available about the environmental health risks experienced by people in residential settings for the developmentally disabled and about how the behaviors and choices of support staff affect the indoor air quality in these residences. This study assessed the home characteristics, household behaviors and practices that place people with developmental disabilities at health risk from environmental hazards in their homes. Homes (N=57) run by three major service providers of residential services for the developmentally disabled in Anne Arundel County, Maryland were selected using random stratified sampling for evaluation. A survey and a home environmental assessment conducted by an observational walk-through of each home were used to assess the presence of neurotoxicants such as lead and mercury in the home, protective devices such as carbon monoxide detectors and radon testing, and the use of behaviors and practices that contribute to indoor pollution from pesticides, environmental tobacco smoke and cleaning products.;Twenty-eight homes (49%) had at least one source of carbon monoxide exposure and 21 (72%) of these homes had no carbon monoxide detector. **Carbon monoxide detectors tended to be more likely in homes with than in homes without carbon monoxide sources. Radon was a concern. Fifty-six of 57 homes were not tested for radon. In 41 of the homes basements, where carbon monoxide and radon are likely to accumulate, were used as living space for staff and developmentally disabled residents. Forty-nine homes reported professional pesticide contracts and 56 homes contained products with volatile organic compounds. Regulation and education of providers is necessary to prevent environmental health risks in this vulnerable population. More research is needed to investigate the home environmental health risks of people with developmental disabilities and their staff living in residential settings.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursingen_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Healthen_US
dc.titleHome environmental health risks of people with developmental disabilitiesen_US
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.contributor.advisorThomas, Sue Ann, 1947-
dc.identifier.ispublishedYes
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